Reciprocal relationships between parenting behavior and disruptive psychopathology from childhood through adolescence

Jeffrey D. Burke, Dustin A. Pardini, Rolf Loeber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

261 Scopus citations

Abstract

Theoretical models suggest that child behaviors influence parenting behaviors, and specifically that unpleasant child behaviors coerce parents to discontinue engaging in appropriate discipline. This study examined reciprocal relationships between parenting behaviors (supervision, communication, involvement, timid discipline and harsh punishment) and child disruptive disorder symptoms (ADHD, ODD and CD) in a clinic-referred sample of 177 boys. Annual measures, including structured clinical interviews, were obtained from the beginning of the study (when boys were between the ages of 7 to 12) to age 17. Specific reciprocal influence was observed; only timid discipline predicted worsening behavior, namely ODD symptoms, and ODD symptoms predicted increases in timid discipline. Greater influence from child behaviors to parenting practices was found: ODD also predicted poorer communication and decreased involvement, and CD predicted poorer supervision. ADHD was neither predictive of, nor predicted by, parenting behaviors. The results are specifically supportive of a coercive process between child behaviors and parenting behaviors, and generally suggestive of greater influence of child behaviors on parenting behaviors than of parenting behaviors on child behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)679-692
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attention deficit hyperactivity
  • Coercion
  • Conduct disorder
  • Disorder
  • Disruptive behavior
  • Oppositional defiant disorder
  • Parenting behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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