Reciprocal influences between maternal parenting and child adjustment in a high-risk population: a 5-year cross-lagged analysis of bidirectional effects

Baptiste Barbot, Elizabeth Crossman, Scott R. Hunter, Elena L. Grigorenko, Suniya Luthar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines longitudinally the bidirectional influences between maternal parenting (behaviors and parenting stress) and mothers' perceptions of their children's adjustment, in a multivariate approach. Data was gathered from 361 low-income mothers (many with psychiatric diagnoses) reporting on their parenting behavior, parenting stress, and their child's adjustment, in a 2-wave longitudinal study over 5 years. Measurement models were developed to derive 4 broad parenting constructs (involvement, control, rejection, and stress) and 3 child adjustment constructs (internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and social competence). After measurement invariance of these constructs was confirmed across relevant groups and over time, both measurement models were integrated in a single crossed-lagged regression analysis of latent constructs. Multiple reciprocal influences were observed between parenting and perceived child adjustment over time: Externalizing and internalizing problems in children were predicted by baseline maternal parenting behaviors, and child social competence was found to reduce parental stress and increase parental involvement and appropriate monitoring. These findings on the motherhood experience are discussed in light of recent research efforts to understand mother-child bidirectional influences and their potential for practical applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-580
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Volume84
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Social Adjustment
Parenting
Mothers
Population
Maternal Behavior
Mental Disorders
Longitudinal Studies
Regression Analysis
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Reciprocal influences between maternal parenting and child adjustment in a high-risk population : a 5-year cross-lagged analysis of bidirectional effects. / Barbot, Baptiste; Crossman, Elizabeth; Hunter, Scott R.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Luthar, Suniya.

In: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, Vol. 84, No. 5, 01.09.2014, p. 567-580.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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