Reciprocal Effects of Alcohol Use and Violence Perpetration Among Early Adolescents in Mexico: A Gendered Analysis

Stephen Kulis, Flavio Marsiglia, Bertha L. Nuño-Gutiérrez, Maria D. Corona-Lozano, Miguel A. Mendoza-Meléndez, Elizabeth Kiehne, Justin Jager, Stephanie L. Ayers, Seung Yong Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although substance use and violent behaviors often emerge together in adolescence, and both have similar widely cited causes and negative consequences for development, it remains unclear whether and how they may be linked causally. This study of early adolescents in Mexico’s three largest cities tested whether alcohol use and violence perpetration are temporally related, whether their relationship is unidirectional or reciprocal, and whether the relationship differs by gender and the type of violence. The study employed longitudinal data from seventh grade students (N = 4830; M age = 12.0, range 11–15; 49% female) in 18 public middle schools in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Students completed questionnaires at the beginning, middle, and end of the 2014–2015 academic year. Students’ responses to a multi-dimensional violence assessment emerged in two distinct patterns: criminally violent acts, and bullying/aggression. Although males engaged in both types of violence more frequently than females at all three time points, they used alcohol more frequently than females only at the first survey, after which the gender gap disappeared. Cross-lagged multi-group path models showed that, for both males and females, more frequent alcohol use predicted subsequent increases in criminally violent behavior, and bullying/aggression predicted later increases in alcohol use. Reciprocal associations varied by gender and type of violence: Alcohol use was reciprocally linked to criminally violent behavior among males only, and reciprocally linked to bullying-aggression among females alone. The results are interpreted in the context of sharply increasing rates of violence in Mexico and changing gender norms, with implications for youth prevention programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of youth and adolescence
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Mexico
Violence
alcohol
Alcohols
violence
adolescent
Bullying
Aggression
aggression
exclusion
gender
Students
student
large city
adolescence
Longitudinal Studies
school grade
cause
questionnaire
Group

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Alcohol
  • Gender
  • Mexico
  • Prevention
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Reciprocal Effects of Alcohol Use and Violence Perpetration Among Early Adolescents in Mexico : A Gendered Analysis. / Kulis, Stephen; Marsiglia, Flavio; Nuño-Gutiérrez, Bertha L.; Corona-Lozano, Maria D.; Mendoza-Meléndez, Miguel A.; Kiehne, Elizabeth; Jager, Justin; Ayers, Stephanie L.; Han, Seung Yong.

In: Journal of youth and adolescence, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kulis, Stephen ; Marsiglia, Flavio ; Nuño-Gutiérrez, Bertha L. ; Corona-Lozano, Maria D. ; Mendoza-Meléndez, Miguel A. ; Kiehne, Elizabeth ; Jager, Justin ; Ayers, Stephanie L. ; Han, Seung Yong. / Reciprocal Effects of Alcohol Use and Violence Perpetration Among Early Adolescents in Mexico : A Gendered Analysis. In: Journal of youth and adolescence. 2019.
@article{2e69a7527f1c404f80f65cefbaa7ca30,
title = "Reciprocal Effects of Alcohol Use and Violence Perpetration Among Early Adolescents in Mexico: A Gendered Analysis",
abstract = "Although substance use and violent behaviors often emerge together in adolescence, and both have similar widely cited causes and negative consequences for development, it remains unclear whether and how they may be linked causally. This study of early adolescents in Mexico’s three largest cities tested whether alcohol use and violence perpetration are temporally related, whether their relationship is unidirectional or reciprocal, and whether the relationship differs by gender and the type of violence. The study employed longitudinal data from seventh grade students (N = 4830; M age = 12.0, range 11–15; 49{\%} female) in 18 public middle schools in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Students completed questionnaires at the beginning, middle, and end of the 2014–2015 academic year. Students’ responses to a multi-dimensional violence assessment emerged in two distinct patterns: criminally violent acts, and bullying/aggression. Although males engaged in both types of violence more frequently than females at all three time points, they used alcohol more frequently than females only at the first survey, after which the gender gap disappeared. Cross-lagged multi-group path models showed that, for both males and females, more frequent alcohol use predicted subsequent increases in criminally violent behavior, and bullying/aggression predicted later increases in alcohol use. Reciprocal associations varied by gender and type of violence: Alcohol use was reciprocally linked to criminally violent behavior among males only, and reciprocally linked to bullying-aggression among females alone. The results are interpreted in the context of sharply increasing rates of violence in Mexico and changing gender norms, with implications for youth prevention programs.",
keywords = "Adolescents, Alcohol, Gender, Mexico, Prevention, Violence",
author = "Stephen Kulis and Flavio Marsiglia and Nu{\~n}o-Guti{\'e}rrez, {Bertha L.} and Corona-Lozano, {Maria D.} and Mendoza-Mel{\'e}ndez, {Miguel A.} and Elizabeth Kiehne and Justin Jager and Ayers, {Stephanie L.} and Han, {Seung Yong}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10964-019-01014-1",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Youth and Adolescence",
issn = "0047-2891",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reciprocal Effects of Alcohol Use and Violence Perpetration Among Early Adolescents in Mexico

T2 - A Gendered Analysis

AU - Kulis, Stephen

AU - Marsiglia, Flavio

AU - Nuño-Gutiérrez, Bertha L.

AU - Corona-Lozano, Maria D.

AU - Mendoza-Meléndez, Miguel A.

AU - Kiehne, Elizabeth

AU - Jager, Justin

AU - Ayers, Stephanie L.

AU - Han, Seung Yong

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Although substance use and violent behaviors often emerge together in adolescence, and both have similar widely cited causes and negative consequences for development, it remains unclear whether and how they may be linked causally. This study of early adolescents in Mexico’s three largest cities tested whether alcohol use and violence perpetration are temporally related, whether their relationship is unidirectional or reciprocal, and whether the relationship differs by gender and the type of violence. The study employed longitudinal data from seventh grade students (N = 4830; M age = 12.0, range 11–15; 49% female) in 18 public middle schools in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Students completed questionnaires at the beginning, middle, and end of the 2014–2015 academic year. Students’ responses to a multi-dimensional violence assessment emerged in two distinct patterns: criminally violent acts, and bullying/aggression. Although males engaged in both types of violence more frequently than females at all three time points, they used alcohol more frequently than females only at the first survey, after which the gender gap disappeared. Cross-lagged multi-group path models showed that, for both males and females, more frequent alcohol use predicted subsequent increases in criminally violent behavior, and bullying/aggression predicted later increases in alcohol use. Reciprocal associations varied by gender and type of violence: Alcohol use was reciprocally linked to criminally violent behavior among males only, and reciprocally linked to bullying-aggression among females alone. The results are interpreted in the context of sharply increasing rates of violence in Mexico and changing gender norms, with implications for youth prevention programs.

AB - Although substance use and violent behaviors often emerge together in adolescence, and both have similar widely cited causes and negative consequences for development, it remains unclear whether and how they may be linked causally. This study of early adolescents in Mexico’s three largest cities tested whether alcohol use and violence perpetration are temporally related, whether their relationship is unidirectional or reciprocal, and whether the relationship differs by gender and the type of violence. The study employed longitudinal data from seventh grade students (N = 4830; M age = 12.0, range 11–15; 49% female) in 18 public middle schools in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Students completed questionnaires at the beginning, middle, and end of the 2014–2015 academic year. Students’ responses to a multi-dimensional violence assessment emerged in two distinct patterns: criminally violent acts, and bullying/aggression. Although males engaged in both types of violence more frequently than females at all three time points, they used alcohol more frequently than females only at the first survey, after which the gender gap disappeared. Cross-lagged multi-group path models showed that, for both males and females, more frequent alcohol use predicted subsequent increases in criminally violent behavior, and bullying/aggression predicted later increases in alcohol use. Reciprocal associations varied by gender and type of violence: Alcohol use was reciprocally linked to criminally violent behavior among males only, and reciprocally linked to bullying-aggression among females alone. The results are interpreted in the context of sharply increasing rates of violence in Mexico and changing gender norms, with implications for youth prevention programs.

KW - Adolescents

KW - Alcohol

KW - Gender

KW - Mexico

KW - Prevention

KW - Violence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064618461&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064618461&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10964-019-01014-1

DO - 10.1007/s10964-019-01014-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 30993595

AN - SCOPUS:85064618461

JO - Journal of Youth and Adolescence

JF - Journal of Youth and Adolescence

SN - 0047-2891

ER -