Recent changes in smoke/haze events in Phoenix, Arizona

A. J. Brazel, S. W. Brazel, Robert Balling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent explosive population growth in Phoenix, Arizona is forcing policy-makers to develop an increased understanding of air quality meteorology in the desert setting. In this investigation, the long-term smoke/haze data base from Phoenix is analyzed to determine the magnitude of temporal changes in smoke/haze frequencies and durations. The results reveal no changes in smoke/haze frequency and intensity, but significant increases in the duration of these events. The findings appear to be related to the impact of the growing urban heat island on the structure of local inversion layers. The results suggest a link between urban-induced temperature and wind changes and air quality levels within a growing metropolitan area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-113
Number of pages6
JournalTheoretical and Applied Climatology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1988

Fingerprint

haze
smoke
air quality
inversion layer
heat island
meteorology
metropolitan area
explosive
population growth
desert
temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Recent changes in smoke/haze events in Phoenix, Arizona. / Brazel, A. J.; Brazel, S. W.; Balling, Robert.

In: Theoretical and Applied Climatology, Vol. 39, No. 2, 06.1988, p. 108-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brazel, A. J. ; Brazel, S. W. ; Balling, Robert. / Recent changes in smoke/haze events in Phoenix, Arizona. In: Theoretical and Applied Climatology. 1988 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 108-113.
@article{332982cef6aa4d9883c7723ecbd2359f,
title = "Recent changes in smoke/haze events in Phoenix, Arizona",
abstract = "The recent explosive population growth in Phoenix, Arizona is forcing policy-makers to develop an increased understanding of air quality meteorology in the desert setting. In this investigation, the long-term smoke/haze data base from Phoenix is analyzed to determine the magnitude of temporal changes in smoke/haze frequencies and durations. The results reveal no changes in smoke/haze frequency and intensity, but significant increases in the duration of these events. The findings appear to be related to the impact of the growing urban heat island on the structure of local inversion layers. The results suggest a link between urban-induced temperature and wind changes and air quality levels within a growing metropolitan area.",
author = "Brazel, {A. J.} and Brazel, {S. W.} and Robert Balling",
year = "1988",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/BF00866396",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "108--113",
journal = "Theorectical and Applied Climatology",
issn = "0177-798X",
publisher = "Springer Wien",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recent changes in smoke/haze events in Phoenix, Arizona

AU - Brazel, A. J.

AU - Brazel, S. W.

AU - Balling, Robert

PY - 1988/6

Y1 - 1988/6

N2 - The recent explosive population growth in Phoenix, Arizona is forcing policy-makers to develop an increased understanding of air quality meteorology in the desert setting. In this investigation, the long-term smoke/haze data base from Phoenix is analyzed to determine the magnitude of temporal changes in smoke/haze frequencies and durations. The results reveal no changes in smoke/haze frequency and intensity, but significant increases in the duration of these events. The findings appear to be related to the impact of the growing urban heat island on the structure of local inversion layers. The results suggest a link between urban-induced temperature and wind changes and air quality levels within a growing metropolitan area.

AB - The recent explosive population growth in Phoenix, Arizona is forcing policy-makers to develop an increased understanding of air quality meteorology in the desert setting. In this investigation, the long-term smoke/haze data base from Phoenix is analyzed to determine the magnitude of temporal changes in smoke/haze frequencies and durations. The results reveal no changes in smoke/haze frequency and intensity, but significant increases in the duration of these events. The findings appear to be related to the impact of the growing urban heat island on the structure of local inversion layers. The results suggest a link between urban-induced temperature and wind changes and air quality levels within a growing metropolitan area.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024247994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024247994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF00866396

DO - 10.1007/BF00866396

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0024247994

VL - 39

SP - 108

EP - 113

JO - Theorectical and Applied Climatology

JF - Theorectical and Applied Climatology

SN - 0177-798X

IS - 2

ER -