Reassessing the relationship between general intelligence and self-control in childhood

Ryan C. Meldrum, Melissa A. Petkovsek, Brian B. Boutwell, Jacob Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intelligence has consistently been recognized as a robust correlate of health, life success, and behavior. Evidence also suggests that intelligence may contribute to another key correlate of behavior: self-control. The current study builds on recent work in this area by examining the association between intelligence and self-control across multiple raters and when accounting for potential confounding influences not accounted for in prior research. Results based on a national sample of U.S. children indicates that higher scores for intelligence are associated with more self-control in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, even when accounting for prior self-control, child executive functioning, maternal intelligence, and maternal self-control. Moreover, the association persisted across both teacher and mother ratings of child self-control. As such, these findings support and extend prior work examining the nexus between intelligence and self-control, and may explain why both traits are important for understanding success across a host of life outcomes in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalIntelligence
Volume60
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Intelligence
Mothers
Behavior Control
Self-Control
Childhood
Self-control
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Childhood
  • Intelligence
  • SECCYD
  • Self-control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Reassessing the relationship between general intelligence and self-control in childhood. / Meldrum, Ryan C.; Petkovsek, Melissa A.; Boutwell, Brian B.; Young, Jacob.

In: Intelligence, Vol. 60, 01.01.2017, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meldrum, Ryan C. ; Petkovsek, Melissa A. ; Boutwell, Brian B. ; Young, Jacob. / Reassessing the relationship between general intelligence and self-control in childhood. In: Intelligence. 2017 ; Vol. 60. pp. 1-9.
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