Real-time viewing of dynamic processes on CdTe surfaces at elevated temperature

David Smith, R. Vogl, Ping Lu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Online video recording with a high-resolution electron microscope has been used to study real-time atomic events occurring at cadmium telluride surfaces over a range of temperatures from 27°C to 500°C. Using the profile imaging mode of observation, different types of surface activity have been documented on (001), (111) and (110) surfaces. For example, the (001) surfaces displayed reversible phase transformations between 2×1 and 3×1 reconstruction at a transition temperature of about 200°C. The (111) surfaces exhibited sublimation by a ledge mechanism that depended upon the terminating surface: layer-by-layer removal invariably occurred for (110) surface terminations whereas bilayer removal was usually seen for terminations by (100) surfaces. Finally, the (110) surface rearranged by a hopping mechanism, but no substantial loss of material was observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMaterials Research Society Symposium Proceedings
Place of PublicationPittsburgh, PA, United States
PublisherPubl by Materials Research Society
Pages133-138
Number of pages6
Volume295
ISBN (Print)1558991905
StatePublished - 1993
EventSymposium on Atomic-scale Imaging of Surfaces and Interfaces -
Duration: Nov 30 1992Dec 2 1992

Other

OtherSymposium on Atomic-scale Imaging of Surfaces and Interfaces
Period11/30/9212/2/92

Fingerprint

Temperature
Cadmium telluride
Video recording
Sublimation
Superconducting transition temperature
Electron microscopes
Phase transitions
Imaging techniques
cadmium telluride

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Smith, D., Vogl, R., & Lu, P. (1993). Real-time viewing of dynamic processes on CdTe surfaces at elevated temperature. In Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings (Vol. 295, pp. 133-138). Pittsburgh, PA, United States: Publ by Materials Research Society.

Real-time viewing of dynamic processes on CdTe surfaces at elevated temperature. / Smith, David; Vogl, R.; Lu, Ping.

Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Vol. 295 Pittsburgh, PA, United States : Publ by Materials Research Society, 1993. p. 133-138.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Smith, D, Vogl, R & Lu, P 1993, Real-time viewing of dynamic processes on CdTe surfaces at elevated temperature. in Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. vol. 295, Publ by Materials Research Society, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, pp. 133-138, Symposium on Atomic-scale Imaging of Surfaces and Interfaces, 11/30/92.
Smith D, Vogl R, Lu P. Real-time viewing of dynamic processes on CdTe surfaces at elevated temperature. In Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Vol. 295. Pittsburgh, PA, United States: Publ by Materials Research Society. 1993. p. 133-138
Smith, David ; Vogl, R. ; Lu, Ping. / Real-time viewing of dynamic processes on CdTe surfaces at elevated temperature. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Vol. 295 Pittsburgh, PA, United States : Publ by Materials Research Society, 1993. pp. 133-138
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