Rationale, design, and baseline findings from HIPP: A randomized controlled trial testing a home-based, individually-tailored physical activity print intervention for African American women in the Deep South

Dori Pekmezi, Cole Ainsworth, Rodney Joseph, Molly S. Bray, Elizabeth Kvale, Shiney Isaac, Renee Desmond, Karen Meneses, Bess Marcus, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African American women report high rates of physical inactivity and related health disparities. In our previous formative research, we conducted a series of qualitative assessments to examine physical activity barriers and intervention preferences among African American women in the Deep South. These data were used to inform a 12-month Home-based, Individually-tailored Physical activity Print (HIPP) intervention, which is currently being evaluated against a wellness contact control condition among 84 post-menopausal African American women residing in the metropolitan area of Birmingham, Alabama. This paper reports the rationale, design and baseline findings of the HIPP trial. The accrued participants had an average age of 57 (SD = 4.7), a BMI of 32.1 kg/m2 (SD = 5.16) with more than half (55%) having a college education and an annual household income under $50,000 (53.6%). At baseline, participants reported an average of 41.5 min/week (SD = 49.7) of moderate intensity physical activity, and 94.1% were in the contemplation or preparation stages of readiness for physical activity. While social support for exercise from friends and family was low, baseline levels of self-efficacy, cognitive and behavioral processes of change, decisional balance, outcome expectations, and enjoyment appeared promising. Baseline data indicated high rates of obesity and low levels of physical activity, providing strong evidence of need for intervention. Moreover, scores on psychosocial measures suggested that such efforts may be well received. This line of research in technology-based approaches for promoting physical activity in African American women in the Deep South has great potential to address health disparities and impact public health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-348
Number of pages9
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume47
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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African Americans
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Architectural Accessibility
Health
Self Efficacy
Research
Social Support
Public Health
Obesity
Technology
Education

Keywords

  • African American women
  • Health disparities
  • Home-based interventions
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Rationale, design, and baseline findings from HIPP : A randomized controlled trial testing a home-based, individually-tailored physical activity print intervention for African American women in the Deep South. / Pekmezi, Dori; Ainsworth, Cole; Joseph, Rodney; Bray, Molly S.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Isaac, Shiney; Desmond, Renee; Meneses, Karen; Marcus, Bess; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, Vol. 47, 01.03.2016, p. 340-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pekmezi, Dori ; Ainsworth, Cole ; Joseph, Rodney ; Bray, Molly S. ; Kvale, Elizabeth ; Isaac, Shiney ; Desmond, Renee ; Meneses, Karen ; Marcus, Bess ; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy. / Rationale, design, and baseline findings from HIPP : A randomized controlled trial testing a home-based, individually-tailored physical activity print intervention for African American women in the Deep South. In: Contemporary Clinical Trials. 2016 ; Vol. 47. pp. 340-348.
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