Abstract

Background: African American (AA) women perform low levels of physical activity (PA) and are disproportionally burdened by cardiometabolic disease conditions when compared to White women and the U.S. population as a whole. These disparities emphasize the need for innovative and effective interventions to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk among AA women. Recent evidence suggests that mobile health (mHealth) interventions have the potential to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Few studies have examined the efficacy of mHealth PA interventions among racial/ethnic minorities, including AA women. This represents a missed opportunity given the reported success of technology-delivered PA interventions in predominately White populations and the high use of technology among AA women. Objective: To describe the design, theoretical rationale, and cultural relevance of Smart Walk, a culturally sensitive smartphone-delivered PA intervention for AA women. Design and methods: Smart Walk is an 8-month, randomized controlled pilot trial designed to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk among AA women. Sixty physically inactive AA women with obesity will be assigned to receive either a culturally relevant intervention designed to increase PA (by targeting leisure-time, household chore/task-related, and occupational PA) or a culturally relevant wellness attention-matched control condition. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 4 months, and 8 months, and include feasibility and acceptability of the PA intervention and evaluation of effects on PA and cardiometabolic risk factors. Smart Walk represents a culturally relevant, theory-based approach to promote PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk in AA women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-60
Number of pages15
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume77
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Risk Reduction Behavior
African Americans
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Telemedicine
Smartphone
Technology
Leisure Activities
Population
Obesity

Keywords

  • Cardiometabolic health
  • eHealth
  • Exercise
  • Interventions
  • mHealth
  • Minority health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

@article{7e8756a4cc5e4535907ba4b915a5f860,
title = "Rationale and design of Smart Walk: A randomized controlled pilot trial of a smartphone-delivered physical activity and cardiometabolic risk reduction intervention for African American women",
abstract = "Background: African American (AA) women perform low levels of physical activity (PA) and are disproportionally burdened by cardiometabolic disease conditions when compared to White women and the U.S. population as a whole. These disparities emphasize the need for innovative and effective interventions to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk among AA women. Recent evidence suggests that mobile health (mHealth) interventions have the potential to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Few studies have examined the efficacy of mHealth PA interventions among racial/ethnic minorities, including AA women. This represents a missed opportunity given the reported success of technology-delivered PA interventions in predominately White populations and the high use of technology among AA women. Objective: To describe the design, theoretical rationale, and cultural relevance of Smart Walk, a culturally sensitive smartphone-delivered PA intervention for AA women. Design and methods: Smart Walk is an 8-month, randomized controlled pilot trial designed to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk among AA women. Sixty physically inactive AA women with obesity will be assigned to receive either a culturally relevant intervention designed to increase PA (by targeting leisure-time, household chore/task-related, and occupational PA) or a culturally relevant wellness attention-matched control condition. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 4 months, and 8 months, and include feasibility and acceptability of the PA intervention and evaluation of effects on PA and cardiometabolic risk factors. Smart Walk represents a culturally relevant, theory-based approach to promote PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk in AA women.",
keywords = "Cardiometabolic health, eHealth, Exercise, Interventions, mHealth, Minority health",
author = "Rodney Joseph and Barbara Ainsworth and Sonia Vega-Lopez and Marc Adams and Kevin Hollingshead and Hooker, {Steven P.} and Michael Todd and Glenn Gaesser and Colleen Keller",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
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T1 - Rationale and design of Smart Walk

T2 - A randomized controlled pilot trial of a smartphone-delivered physical activity and cardiometabolic risk reduction intervention for African American women

AU - Joseph, Rodney

AU - Ainsworth, Barbara

AU - Vega-Lopez, Sonia

AU - Adams, Marc

AU - Hollingshead, Kevin

AU - Hooker, Steven P.

AU - Todd, Michael

AU - Gaesser, Glenn

AU - Keller, Colleen

PY - 2019/2/1

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N2 - Background: African American (AA) women perform low levels of physical activity (PA) and are disproportionally burdened by cardiometabolic disease conditions when compared to White women and the U.S. population as a whole. These disparities emphasize the need for innovative and effective interventions to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk among AA women. Recent evidence suggests that mobile health (mHealth) interventions have the potential to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Few studies have examined the efficacy of mHealth PA interventions among racial/ethnic minorities, including AA women. This represents a missed opportunity given the reported success of technology-delivered PA interventions in predominately White populations and the high use of technology among AA women. Objective: To describe the design, theoretical rationale, and cultural relevance of Smart Walk, a culturally sensitive smartphone-delivered PA intervention for AA women. Design and methods: Smart Walk is an 8-month, randomized controlled pilot trial designed to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk among AA women. Sixty physically inactive AA women with obesity will be assigned to receive either a culturally relevant intervention designed to increase PA (by targeting leisure-time, household chore/task-related, and occupational PA) or a culturally relevant wellness attention-matched control condition. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 4 months, and 8 months, and include feasibility and acceptability of the PA intervention and evaluation of effects on PA and cardiometabolic risk factors. Smart Walk represents a culturally relevant, theory-based approach to promote PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk in AA women.

AB - Background: African American (AA) women perform low levels of physical activity (PA) and are disproportionally burdened by cardiometabolic disease conditions when compared to White women and the U.S. population as a whole. These disparities emphasize the need for innovative and effective interventions to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk among AA women. Recent evidence suggests that mobile health (mHealth) interventions have the potential to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Few studies have examined the efficacy of mHealth PA interventions among racial/ethnic minorities, including AA women. This represents a missed opportunity given the reported success of technology-delivered PA interventions in predominately White populations and the high use of technology among AA women. Objective: To describe the design, theoretical rationale, and cultural relevance of Smart Walk, a culturally sensitive smartphone-delivered PA intervention for AA women. Design and methods: Smart Walk is an 8-month, randomized controlled pilot trial designed to increase PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk among AA women. Sixty physically inactive AA women with obesity will be assigned to receive either a culturally relevant intervention designed to increase PA (by targeting leisure-time, household chore/task-related, and occupational PA) or a culturally relevant wellness attention-matched control condition. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 4 months, and 8 months, and include feasibility and acceptability of the PA intervention and evaluation of effects on PA and cardiometabolic risk factors. Smart Walk represents a culturally relevant, theory-based approach to promote PA and reduce cardiometabolic disease risk in AA women.

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