"Rational" observational systems of educational accountability and reform

Audrey Beardsley, Jessica Holloway-Libell, Anna Montana Cirell, Alice Hays, Kathryn Chapman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is something incalculable about teacher expertise and whether it can be observed, detected, quantified, and as per current educational policies, used as an accountability tool to hold America's public school teachers accountable for that which they do (or do not do well). In this commentary, authors (all of whom are former public school teachers) argue that rubric-based teacher observational systems, developed to assess the extent to which teachers adapt and follow sets of rubric-based rules, might actually constrain teacher expertise. Moreover, authors frame their comments using the Dreyfus Model (1980, 1986) to illustrate how observational systems and the rational conceptions on which they are based might be stifling educational progress and reform.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPractical Assessment, Research and Evaluation
Volume20
Issue number17
StatePublished - 2015

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reform
responsibility
teacher
expertise
educational policy
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

"Rational" observational systems of educational accountability and reform. / Beardsley, Audrey; Holloway-Libell, Jessica; Cirell, Anna Montana; Hays, Alice; Chapman, Kathryn.

In: Practical Assessment, Research and Evaluation, Vol. 20, No. 17, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beardsley, Audrey ; Holloway-Libell, Jessica ; Cirell, Anna Montana ; Hays, Alice ; Chapman, Kathryn. / "Rational" observational systems of educational accountability and reform. In: Practical Assessment, Research and Evaluation. 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 17.
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