Rating the digital help: electronic medical records, software providers, and physicians

Richard J. Butler, William Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

To separate the effects of physicians’ characteristics on the perceived productivity of EMRs from the effects of limitations on usability inherent in EMR design, a multivariate regression model is used to estimate the factors influencing physicians’ rankings of five attributes of their EMRs, namely; ease of use and reliability; the EMRs effect on physician and staff productivity and the EMRs performance vs. vendor’s promises. We divide the factors influencing the rankings into three groups: physician characteristics, EMR characteristics and practice characteristics (type of practice, size, and location). The data are from approximately 1800 practicing physicians in Arizona. Physician’s characteristics influence perceived ease of use and physicians’ productivity, but not staff productivity, reliability or vendors’ promised performance. Practice type and EMR characteristics affect perceived productivity, reliability and performance versus vendors’ promises. Vendor-specific effects are highly correlated across all five attributes and are always jointly significant. EMR characteristics are the most significant influence on physicians’ perceptions of the EMRs effect on their productivity and that of their staff. Physicians’ characteristics (particularly age) have a small but significant influence on perceived productivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-283
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Health Economics and Management
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Keywords

  • Ease of use
  • EHR
  • EMR
  • Physician perceptions
  • Productivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

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