Abstract

To combat antibiotic resistance, a rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) technology that can identify resistant infections at disease onset is required. Current clinical AST technologies take 1-3 days, which is often too slow for accurate treatment. Here we demonstrate a rapid AST method by tracking sub-μm scale bacterial motion with an optical imaging and tracking technique. We apply the method to clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157: H7 and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) loosely tethered to a glass surface. By analyzing dose-dependent sub-μm motion changes in a population of bacterial cells, we obtain the minimum bactericidal concentration within 2 h using human urine samples spiked with UPEC. We validate the AST method using the standard culture-based AST methods. In addition to population studies, the method allows single cell analysis, which can identify subpopulations of resistance strains within a sample.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1231-1239
Number of pages9
JournalACS Sensors
Volume2
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 25 2017

Fingerprint

antibiotics
Antibiotics
Escherichia coli
Anti-Bacterial Agents
magnetic permeability
Testing
cells
combat
pathogens
urine
Pathogens
infectious diseases
Escherichia
imaging techniques
Cells
Imaging techniques
Glass
dosage
glass

Keywords

  • antibiotic resistant
  • bacterial motion
  • bacterial viability
  • imaging diagnostics
  • microscopic urinalysis
  • rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Rapid Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Uropathogenic E. coli by Tracking Submicron Scale Motion of Single Bacterial Cells. / Syal, Karan; Shen, Simon; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Haydel, Shelley; Tao, Nongjian.

In: ACS Sensors, Vol. 2, No. 8, 25.08.2017, p. 1231-1239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Haydel, Shelley

AU - Tao, Nongjian

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