Randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for insomnia in breast cancer survivors.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating insomnia in breast cancer survivors. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: University and medical center settings. SAMPLE: 72 women at least three months after primary treatment for breast cancer with sleep-onset or sleep maintenance insomnia at least three nights per week for at least three months as determined through daily sleep diaries. METHODS: Random assignment to a multicomponent intervention (stimulus control instructions, sleep restriction, and sleep education and hygiene) or a single-component control group (sleep education and hygiene). MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality. FINDINGS: After the intervention, both groups improved on sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality based on daily sleep diaries. A between-group difference existed for time in bed. Wrist actigraph data showed significant pre- to postintervention changes for sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and time in bed. When compared to the control group, the multicomponent intervention group rated overall sleep as more improved. CONCLUSIONS: A nonpharmacologic intervention is effective in the treatment of insomnia in breast cancer survivors. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Breast cancer survivors can benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention for chronic insomnia. Sleep education and hygiene, a less complex treatment than a multicomponent intervention, also is effective in treating insomnia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOncology Nursing Forum
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Survivors
Sleep
Breast Neoplasms
Education
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

@article{3c234add078641b9a615e78b5f4d5eae,
title = "Randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for insomnia in breast cancer survivors.",
abstract = "PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating insomnia in breast cancer survivors. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: University and medical center settings. SAMPLE: 72 women at least three months after primary treatment for breast cancer with sleep-onset or sleep maintenance insomnia at least three nights per week for at least three months as determined through daily sleep diaries. METHODS: Random assignment to a multicomponent intervention (stimulus control instructions, sleep restriction, and sleep education and hygiene) or a single-component control group (sleep education and hygiene). MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality. FINDINGS: After the intervention, both groups improved on sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality based on daily sleep diaries. A between-group difference existed for time in bed. Wrist actigraph data showed significant pre- to postintervention changes for sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and time in bed. When compared to the control group, the multicomponent intervention group rated overall sleep as more improved. CONCLUSIONS: A nonpharmacologic intervention is effective in the treatment of insomnia in breast cancer survivors. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Breast cancer survivors can benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention for chronic insomnia. Sleep education and hygiene, a less complex treatment than a multicomponent intervention, also is effective in treating insomnia.",
author = "Dana Epstein and Shannon Dirksen",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1188/07.ONF.E51-E59",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
journal = "Oncology Nursing Forum",
issn = "0190-535X",
publisher = "Oncology Nursing Society",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for insomnia in breast cancer survivors.

AU - Epstein, Dana

AU - Dirksen, Shannon

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating insomnia in breast cancer survivors. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: University and medical center settings. SAMPLE: 72 women at least three months after primary treatment for breast cancer with sleep-onset or sleep maintenance insomnia at least three nights per week for at least three months as determined through daily sleep diaries. METHODS: Random assignment to a multicomponent intervention (stimulus control instructions, sleep restriction, and sleep education and hygiene) or a single-component control group (sleep education and hygiene). MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality. FINDINGS: After the intervention, both groups improved on sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality based on daily sleep diaries. A between-group difference existed for time in bed. Wrist actigraph data showed significant pre- to postintervention changes for sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and time in bed. When compared to the control group, the multicomponent intervention group rated overall sleep as more improved. CONCLUSIONS: A nonpharmacologic intervention is effective in the treatment of insomnia in breast cancer survivors. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Breast cancer survivors can benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention for chronic insomnia. Sleep education and hygiene, a less complex treatment than a multicomponent intervention, also is effective in treating insomnia.

AB - PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating insomnia in breast cancer survivors. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: University and medical center settings. SAMPLE: 72 women at least three months after primary treatment for breast cancer with sleep-onset or sleep maintenance insomnia at least three nights per week for at least three months as determined through daily sleep diaries. METHODS: Random assignment to a multicomponent intervention (stimulus control instructions, sleep restriction, and sleep education and hygiene) or a single-component control group (sleep education and hygiene). MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality. FINDINGS: After the intervention, both groups improved on sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality based on daily sleep diaries. A between-group difference existed for time in bed. Wrist actigraph data showed significant pre- to postintervention changes for sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and time in bed. When compared to the control group, the multicomponent intervention group rated overall sleep as more improved. CONCLUSIONS: A nonpharmacologic intervention is effective in the treatment of insomnia in breast cancer survivors. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Breast cancer survivors can benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention for chronic insomnia. Sleep education and hygiene, a less complex treatment than a multicomponent intervention, also is effective in treating insomnia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35548981292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35548981292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1188/07.ONF.E51-E59

DO - 10.1188/07.ONF.E51-E59

M3 - Article

C2 - 17878117

AN - SCOPUS:35548981292

VL - 34

JO - Oncology Nursing Forum

JF - Oncology Nursing Forum

SN - 0190-535X

IS - 5

ER -