Rabbits killing birds revisited

Jimin Zhang, Meng Fan, Yang Kuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We formulate and study a three-species population model consisting of an endemic prey (bird), an alien prey (rabbit) and an alien predator (cat). Our model overcomes several model construction problems in existing models. Moreover, our model generates richer, more reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rabbit or the cat when the bird is endangered. We confirm the existence of the hyperpredation phenomenon, which is a big potential threat to most endemic prey. Specifically, we show that, in an endemic prey-alien prey-alien predator system, eradication of introduced predators such as the cat alone is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey since predator control may fail to protect the indigenous prey when the control of the introduced prey is not carried out simultaneously.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-123
Number of pages24
JournalMathematical Biosciences
Volume203
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

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Birds
Rabbit
Prey
rabbits
Rabbits
bird
Cats
birds
predator
cats
predators
Raptors
Predator
Predator prey systems
predator control
Prey-predator
Prey-predator System
birds of prey
Population Model
Model

Keywords

  • Apparent competition
  • Bird conservation
  • Control strategies
  • Hyperpredation process
  • Mathematical models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Rabbits killing birds revisited. / Zhang, Jimin; Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang.

In: Mathematical Biosciences, Vol. 203, No. 1, 09.2006, p. 100-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Jimin ; Fan, Meng ; Kuang, Yang. / Rabbits killing birds revisited. In: Mathematical Biosciences. 2006 ; Vol. 203, No. 1. pp. 100-123.
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