Queen specific exocrine glands in legionary ants and their possible function in sexual selection

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The colonies of army ants and some other legionary ant species have single, permanently wingless queens with massive post petioles and large gasters. Such highly modified queens are called dichthadiigynes. This paper presents the unusually rich exocrine gland endowment of dichthadiigynes, which is not found in queens of other ant species. It has been suggested these kinds of glands produce secretions that attract and maintain worker retinues around queens, especially during migration. However, large worker retinues also occur in non-legionary species whose queens do not have such an exuberance of exocrine glands. We argue and present evidence in support of our previously proposed hypothesis that the enormous outfit of exocrine glands found in dichthadiigynes is due to sexual selection mediated by workers as the main selecting agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0151604
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Exocrine Glands
exocrine glands
Ants
queen insects
sexual selection
Formicidae
Financial Management
petioles
secretion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Queen specific exocrine glands in legionary ants and their possible function in sexual selection. / Hoelldobler, Berthold.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 3, e0151604, 01.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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