Quasi-static and dynamic behavior of additively manufactured metallic lattice cylinders

Hossein Sadeghi, Dhruv Bhate, Joseph Abraham, Joseph Magallanes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this paper, quasi-static and dynamic behavior of additively manufactured stainless steel lattice cylinders is studied. Cylindrical samples with internal lattice structure are fabricated by a laser powder bed fusion system. Equivalent hollow cylindrical samples with the same length, outer diameter, and mass are also fabricated. Split Hopkinson bar is used to study the behavior of the specimens under high strain rate loading. It is observed that lattice cylinders reduce the transmitted wave amplitude up to about 21% compared to their equivalent hollow cylinders. However, the lower transmitted wave energy in lattice cylinders comes at the expense of a greater reduction in their stiffness, when compared to their equivalent hollow cylinder. In addition, it is observed that increasing the loading rate by five orders of magnitude leads to up to about 36% increase in the peak force that the lattice cylinder can carry, which is attributed to strain rate hardening effect in the bulk stainless steel material. Finite element simulations of the specimens under dynamic loads are performed to study the effect of strain rate hardening, thermal softening, and the failure mode on dynamic behavior of the specimens. Numerical results are compared with experimental data and good qualitative agreement is observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationShock Compression of Condensed Matter - 2017
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the Conference of the American Physical Society Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter
EditorsMarcus D. Knudson, Eric N. Brown, Ricky Chau, Timothy C. Germann, J. Matthew D. Lane, Jon H. Eggert
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
Volume1979
ISBN (Electronic)9780735416932
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2018
Event20th Biennial American Physical Society Conference on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter, SCCM 2017 - St. Louis, United States
Duration: Jul 9 2017Jul 14 2017

Other

Other20th Biennial American Physical Society Conference on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter, SCCM 2017
CountryUnited States
CitySt. Louis
Period7/9/177/14/17

Fingerprint

strain rate
hollow
hardening
stainless steels
dynamic loads
loading rate
failure modes
softening
beds
stiffness
fusion
lasers
simulation
energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Sadeghi, H., Bhate, D., Abraham, J., & Magallanes, J. (2018). Quasi-static and dynamic behavior of additively manufactured metallic lattice cylinders. In M. D. Knudson, E. N. Brown, R. Chau, T. C. Germann, J. M. D. Lane, & J. H. Eggert (Eds.), Shock Compression of Condensed Matter - 2017: Proceedings of the Conference of the American Physical Society Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (Vol. 1979). [070029] American Institute of Physics Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5044838

Quasi-static and dynamic behavior of additively manufactured metallic lattice cylinders. / Sadeghi, Hossein; Bhate, Dhruv; Abraham, Joseph; Magallanes, Joseph.

Shock Compression of Condensed Matter - 2017: Proceedings of the Conference of the American Physical Society Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter. ed. / Marcus D. Knudson; Eric N. Brown; Ricky Chau; Timothy C. Germann; J. Matthew D. Lane; Jon H. Eggert. Vol. 1979 American Institute of Physics Inc., 2018. 070029.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sadeghi, H, Bhate, D, Abraham, J & Magallanes, J 2018, Quasi-static and dynamic behavior of additively manufactured metallic lattice cylinders. in MD Knudson, EN Brown, R Chau, TC Germann, JMD Lane & JH Eggert (eds), Shock Compression of Condensed Matter - 2017: Proceedings of the Conference of the American Physical Society Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter. vol. 1979, 070029, American Institute of Physics Inc., 20th Biennial American Physical Society Conference on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter, SCCM 2017, St. Louis, United States, 7/9/17. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5044838
Sadeghi H, Bhate D, Abraham J, Magallanes J. Quasi-static and dynamic behavior of additively manufactured metallic lattice cylinders. In Knudson MD, Brown EN, Chau R, Germann TC, Lane JMD, Eggert JH, editors, Shock Compression of Condensed Matter - 2017: Proceedings of the Conference of the American Physical Society Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter. Vol. 1979. American Institute of Physics Inc. 2018. 070029 https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5044838
Sadeghi, Hossein ; Bhate, Dhruv ; Abraham, Joseph ; Magallanes, Joseph. / Quasi-static and dynamic behavior of additively manufactured metallic lattice cylinders. Shock Compression of Condensed Matter - 2017: Proceedings of the Conference of the American Physical Society Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter. editor / Marcus D. Knudson ; Eric N. Brown ; Ricky Chau ; Timothy C. Germann ; J. Matthew D. Lane ; Jon H. Eggert. Vol. 1979 American Institute of Physics Inc., 2018.
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