Quantitative analysis of the immunopotency of genetically transfected dendritic cells

Laura Timares, Akira Takashima, Stephen Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) instruct and activate a naive immune system to mount a response toward foreign proteins. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that an ideal vaccine strategy would be to directly introduce genes encoding antigens into DCs. To test this strategy quantitatively, we have compared the immune response elicited by a genetically transfected DC line to that induced by a fibroblast line, or standard genetic immunization. We observe that a single injection of 500-1,000 transfected DCs can produce a response comparable to that of standard genetic immunization, whereas fibroblasts, with up to 50-fold greater transfection efficiency, were less potent. We conclude that transfection of a small number of DCs is sufficient to initiate a wide variety of immune responses. These results indicate that targeting genes to DCs will be important for controlling and augmenting the immunological outcome in genetic immunization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13147-13152
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume95
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Dendritic Cells
Immunization
Transfection
Fibroblasts
Gene Targeting
Immune System
Vaccines
Antigens
Cell Line
Injections
Genes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Quantitative analysis of the immunopotency of genetically transfected dendritic cells. / Timares, Laura; Takashima, Akira; Johnston, Stephen.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 95, No. 22, 27.10.1998, p. 13147-13152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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