Quality Talk: Developing Students’ Discourse to Promote High-level Comprehension

P. Karen Murphy, Jeffrey A. Greene, Carla Firetto, Brendan D. Hendrick, Mengyi Li, Cristin Montalbano, Liwei Wei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Students often struggle to comprehend complex text. In response, we conducted an initial, year-long study of Quality Talk, a teacher-facilitated, small-group discussion approach designed to enhance students’ basic and high-level comprehension, in two fourth-grade classrooms. Specifically, teachers delivered instructional mini-lessons on discourse elements (e.g., questioning or argumentation) and conducted weekly text-based discussions in their language arts classes. Analysis of the videorecorded discussions showed decreases in teacher-initiated discourse elements, indicating a release of responsibility to students, whereas students’ discourse reflected increased critical-analytic thinking (e.g., elaborated explanations or exploratory talk). Importantly, statistically and practically significant increases were evidenced on written measures of students’ basic and high-level comprehension, indicating the promise of small-group discourse as a way to foster individual student learning outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1160
Number of pages48
JournalAmerican Educational Research Journal
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

comprehension
discourse
student
small group
teacher
argumentation
group discussion
art
classroom
responsibility
language
learning

Keywords

  • argumentation
  • classroom discussion
  • critical thinking
  • Quality Talk
  • reading comprehension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Quality Talk : Developing Students’ Discourse to Promote High-level Comprehension. / Murphy, P. Karen; Greene, Jeffrey A.; Firetto, Carla; Hendrick, Brendan D.; Li, Mengyi; Montalbano, Cristin; Wei, Liwei.

In: American Educational Research Journal, Vol. 55, No. 5, 01.10.2018, p. 1113-1160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murphy, P. Karen ; Greene, Jeffrey A. ; Firetto, Carla ; Hendrick, Brendan D. ; Li, Mengyi ; Montalbano, Cristin ; Wei, Liwei. / Quality Talk : Developing Students’ Discourse to Promote High-level Comprehension. In: American Educational Research Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 55, No. 5. pp. 1113-1160.
@article{18176d22461b420ea5c043ed3a119805,
title = "Quality Talk: Developing Students’ Discourse to Promote High-level Comprehension",
abstract = "Students often struggle to comprehend complex text. In response, we conducted an initial, year-long study of Quality Talk, a teacher-facilitated, small-group discussion approach designed to enhance students’ basic and high-level comprehension, in two fourth-grade classrooms. Specifically, teachers delivered instructional mini-lessons on discourse elements (e.g., questioning or argumentation) and conducted weekly text-based discussions in their language arts classes. Analysis of the videorecorded discussions showed decreases in teacher-initiated discourse elements, indicating a release of responsibility to students, whereas students’ discourse reflected increased critical-analytic thinking (e.g., elaborated explanations or exploratory talk). Importantly, statistically and practically significant increases were evidenced on written measures of students’ basic and high-level comprehension, indicating the promise of small-group discourse as a way to foster individual student learning outcomes.",
keywords = "argumentation, classroom discussion, critical thinking, Quality Talk, reading comprehension",
author = "Murphy, {P. Karen} and Greene, {Jeffrey A.} and Carla Firetto and Hendrick, {Brendan D.} and Mengyi Li and Cristin Montalbano and Liwei Wei",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3102/0002831218771303",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "1113--1160",
journal = "American Educational Research Journal",
issn = "0002-8312",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality Talk

T2 - Developing Students’ Discourse to Promote High-level Comprehension

AU - Murphy, P. Karen

AU - Greene, Jeffrey A.

AU - Firetto, Carla

AU - Hendrick, Brendan D.

AU - Li, Mengyi

AU - Montalbano, Cristin

AU - Wei, Liwei

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Students often struggle to comprehend complex text. In response, we conducted an initial, year-long study of Quality Talk, a teacher-facilitated, small-group discussion approach designed to enhance students’ basic and high-level comprehension, in two fourth-grade classrooms. Specifically, teachers delivered instructional mini-lessons on discourse elements (e.g., questioning or argumentation) and conducted weekly text-based discussions in their language arts classes. Analysis of the videorecorded discussions showed decreases in teacher-initiated discourse elements, indicating a release of responsibility to students, whereas students’ discourse reflected increased critical-analytic thinking (e.g., elaborated explanations or exploratory talk). Importantly, statistically and practically significant increases were evidenced on written measures of students’ basic and high-level comprehension, indicating the promise of small-group discourse as a way to foster individual student learning outcomes.

AB - Students often struggle to comprehend complex text. In response, we conducted an initial, year-long study of Quality Talk, a teacher-facilitated, small-group discussion approach designed to enhance students’ basic and high-level comprehension, in two fourth-grade classrooms. Specifically, teachers delivered instructional mini-lessons on discourse elements (e.g., questioning or argumentation) and conducted weekly text-based discussions in their language arts classes. Analysis of the videorecorded discussions showed decreases in teacher-initiated discourse elements, indicating a release of responsibility to students, whereas students’ discourse reflected increased critical-analytic thinking (e.g., elaborated explanations or exploratory talk). Importantly, statistically and practically significant increases were evidenced on written measures of students’ basic and high-level comprehension, indicating the promise of small-group discourse as a way to foster individual student learning outcomes.

KW - argumentation

KW - classroom discussion

KW - critical thinking

KW - Quality Talk

KW - reading comprehension

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053669639&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053669639&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3102/0002831218771303

DO - 10.3102/0002831218771303

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85053669639

VL - 55

SP - 1113

EP - 1160

JO - American Educational Research Journal

JF - American Educational Research Journal

SN - 0002-8312

IS - 5

ER -