Pushing back the expansion of introns in animal genomes

Sudhir Kumar, S. Blair Hedges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a recent paper in Science, Raible et al. (2005) surveyed the position of introns in 30 genes of a marine annelid and showed that over 60% of the introns occupy positions identical to those in human homologs. In contrast, both human and marine annelid genes share only 30% of their introns with other invertebrates. These observations suggest that the common ancestor of most animal phyla had intron-rich genes and reinforce the notion that introns proliferated early in the evolutionary history of eukaryotes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1182-1184
Number of pages3
JournalCell
Volume123
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 29 2005

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Introns
Animals
Genes
Genome
Invertebrates
Eukaryota
History

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Pushing back the expansion of introns in animal genomes. / Kumar, Sudhir; Hedges, S. Blair.

In: Cell, Vol. 123, No. 7, 29.12.2005, p. 1182-1184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kumar, Sudhir ; Hedges, S. Blair. / Pushing back the expansion of introns in animal genomes. In: Cell. 2005 ; Vol. 123, No. 7. pp. 1182-1184.
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