Punishing the Children of Immigrants: Race, Ethnicity, Generational Status, Student Misbehavior, and School Discipline

Anthony A. Peguero, Zahra Shekarkhar, Ann Marie Popp, Dixie J. Koo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using segmented assimilation theory, this study examines whether the children of immigrants’ experiences with being disciplined at school are disproportionate. This study draws from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 and utilizes multilevel techniques to analyze the relationships between race, ethnicity, generational status, misbehavior, and school discipline. Findings reveal that Black/African American second- and third-plus generation as well as Latina/o American third-plus generation youth have increased odds of being disciplined despite having similar levels of misbehavior as their White American peers. The implications of the racial and ethnic, as well as generational, disparities in school discipline practices are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-220
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • School discipline, race and ethnicity, assimilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Health(social science)
  • Geography, Planning and Development

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