Pulse coupled oscillators' primitives for collision-free multiple access with application to body area networks

Roberto Pagliari, Y. W P Hong, Anna Scaglione

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper investigates strategies to achieve collectively coordination in sensor networks, with extremely limited complexity. We propose and compare novel backoff mechanisms to achieve adaptively the desired scheduling among a number of sensors that contend for their access to the wireless medium. The method considered models the interactions among sensors as that of pulse coupled oscillators (PCO), which have been widely studied in mathematical biology to capture the interaction among biological entities (such as neurons) and the emergence of firing patterns in their networks. Modeling our sensors as UWB pulse emitters, our interest in this paper is to discuss strategies that allow the sensors to interleave their pulsing activities in a sequence so as to provide a frame subdivision for the collision free transmissions. The bio-inspired algorithm featured is a useful network primitive for multiple access in highly scalable sensor networks, which adds on to the well known primitive for network synchronization where PCO models are popular for.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008 - Aalborg, Denmark
Duration: Oct 25 2008Oct 28 2008

Other

Other2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008
CountryDenmark
CityAalborg
Period10/25/0810/28/08

Fingerprint

Sensors
Sensor networks
Ultra-wideband (UWB)
Neurons
Synchronization
Scheduling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Pagliari, R., Hong, Y. W. P., & Scaglione, A. (2008). Pulse coupled oscillators' primitives for collision-free multiple access with application to body area networks. In 2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008 [4712615] https://doi.org/10.1109/ISABEL.2008.4712615

Pulse coupled oscillators' primitives for collision-free multiple access with application to body area networks. / Pagliari, Roberto; Hong, Y. W P; Scaglione, Anna.

2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008. 2008. 4712615.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Pagliari, R, Hong, YWP & Scaglione, A 2008, Pulse coupled oscillators' primitives for collision-free multiple access with application to body area networks. in 2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008., 4712615, 2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008, Aalborg, Denmark, 10/25/08. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISABEL.2008.4712615
Pagliari R, Hong YWP, Scaglione A. Pulse coupled oscillators' primitives for collision-free multiple access with application to body area networks. In 2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008. 2008. 4712615 https://doi.org/10.1109/ISABEL.2008.4712615
Pagliari, Roberto ; Hong, Y. W P ; Scaglione, Anna. / Pulse coupled oscillators' primitives for collision-free multiple access with application to body area networks. 2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008. 2008.
@inproceedings{18aa477fa95f420286f86b936db7cc72,
title = "Pulse coupled oscillators' primitives for collision-free multiple access with application to body area networks",
abstract = "This paper investigates strategies to achieve collectively coordination in sensor networks, with extremely limited complexity. We propose and compare novel backoff mechanisms to achieve adaptively the desired scheduling among a number of sensors that contend for their access to the wireless medium. The method considered models the interactions among sensors as that of pulse coupled oscillators (PCO), which have been widely studied in mathematical biology to capture the interaction among biological entities (such as neurons) and the emergence of firing patterns in their networks. Modeling our sensors as UWB pulse emitters, our interest in this paper is to discuss strategies that allow the sensors to interleave their pulsing activities in a sequence so as to provide a frame subdivision for the collision free transmissions. The bio-inspired algorithm featured is a useful network primitive for multiple access in highly scalable sensor networks, which adds on to the well known primitive for network synchronization where PCO models are popular for.",
author = "Roberto Pagliari and Hong, {Y. W P} and Anna Scaglione",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1109/ISABEL.2008.4712615",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781424426478",
booktitle = "2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Pulse coupled oscillators' primitives for collision-free multiple access with application to body area networks

AU - Pagliari, Roberto

AU - Hong, Y. W P

AU - Scaglione, Anna

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - This paper investigates strategies to achieve collectively coordination in sensor networks, with extremely limited complexity. We propose and compare novel backoff mechanisms to achieve adaptively the desired scheduling among a number of sensors that contend for their access to the wireless medium. The method considered models the interactions among sensors as that of pulse coupled oscillators (PCO), which have been widely studied in mathematical biology to capture the interaction among biological entities (such as neurons) and the emergence of firing patterns in their networks. Modeling our sensors as UWB pulse emitters, our interest in this paper is to discuss strategies that allow the sensors to interleave their pulsing activities in a sequence so as to provide a frame subdivision for the collision free transmissions. The bio-inspired algorithm featured is a useful network primitive for multiple access in highly scalable sensor networks, which adds on to the well known primitive for network synchronization where PCO models are popular for.

AB - This paper investigates strategies to achieve collectively coordination in sensor networks, with extremely limited complexity. We propose and compare novel backoff mechanisms to achieve adaptively the desired scheduling among a number of sensors that contend for their access to the wireless medium. The method considered models the interactions among sensors as that of pulse coupled oscillators (PCO), which have been widely studied in mathematical biology to capture the interaction among biological entities (such as neurons) and the emergence of firing patterns in their networks. Modeling our sensors as UWB pulse emitters, our interest in this paper is to discuss strategies that allow the sensors to interleave their pulsing activities in a sequence so as to provide a frame subdivision for the collision free transmissions. The bio-inspired algorithm featured is a useful network primitive for multiple access in highly scalable sensor networks, which adds on to the well known primitive for network synchronization where PCO models are popular for.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67650112147&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67650112147&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/ISABEL.2008.4712615

DO - 10.1109/ISABEL.2008.4712615

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:67650112147

SN - 9781424426478

BT - 2008 1st International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL 2008

ER -