Public science and public innovation: Assessing the relationship between patenting at U.S. National Laboratories and the Bayh-Dole Act

Albert N. Link, Donald Siegel, David Van Fleet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most studies of the effects of the Bayh-Dole Act have focused on universities. In contrast, we analyze patenting activity at two prominent national laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology before and after the enactment of this legislation and the Stevenson-Wydler Act. It appears as though the enactment of Bayh-Dole and the Stevenson-Wydler Act were not sufficient to induce an increase in patenting at these labs. However, the establishment of financial incentive systems, embodied in passage of the Federal Technology Transfer Act, as well as the allocation of internal resources to support technology transfer, stimulated an increase in such activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1094-1099
Number of pages6
JournalResearch Policy
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

Keywords

  • Bayh-Dole Act
  • Federal Technology Transfer Act
  • Patenting
  • Stevenson-Wydler Act
  • U.S. National Laboratories

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management
  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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