Psychosocial stress, bicultural identity integration, and bicultural self-efficacy among Hispanic emerging adults

Miguel Ángel Cano, Flavio F. Marsiglia, Alan Meca, Mario De La Rosa, Daisy Ramírez-Ortiz, Mariana Sánchez, José Félix Colón Burgos, Saul G. Alamilla, Gabriella Wuyke, Daniel Parras, Syed Zain Ali, Derrick J. Forney, Emil Varas-Rodríguez, Yanet Ruvalcaba, Andrea Contreras, Shyfuddin Ahmed, Beatriz Vega-Luna, Lucas G. Ochoa, Rebecca Cuadra, Mario J. Domínguez García

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Most studies on psychosocial stress among Hispanics have focused on risk factors. To better understand psychosocial stress among this population, this study aimed to examine components of bicultural identity integration and bicultural self-efficacy, that may be associated with lower psychosocial stress among Hispanic emerging adults (ages 18–25). This aim was tested on a cross-sectional sample of Hispanic emerging adults (Mage = 21.30, SD = 2.09) that included 200 participants (Arizona n = 99, Florida n = 101). The sample included men (n = 98) and women (n = 102). Most participants were US-born (70%), college students (69.5%), and of Mexican heritage (44%). Standardized coefficients from a hierarchical multiple regression model indicate that higher levels of the bicultural harmony component of bicultural identity integration (β = −0.26, p < 0.001) and the social groundedness component of bicultural self-efficacy (β = −0.23, p < 0.01) were associated with lower levels of psychosocial stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine components of bicultural identity integration and bicultural self-efficacy and their respective associations with psychosocial stress among any racial/ethnic group. Thus, more studies are needed to replicate our findings to determine if bicultural identity integration and bicultural self-efficacy should be considered in psychosocial stress interventions for Hispanics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalStress and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hispanic emerging adults
  • Latino
  • bicultural competence
  • bicultural identity integration
  • bicultural self-efficacy
  • biculturalism
  • psychological stress
  • psychosocial stress
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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