Psychosocial factors and theory in physical activity studies in minorities

Scherezade K. Mama, Lorna H. McNeill, Sheryl A. McCurdy, Alexandra E. Evans, Pamela M. Diamond, Heather J. Adamus-Leach, Rebecca Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To summarize the effectiveness of interventions targeting psychosocial factors to increase physical activity (PA) among ethnic minority adults and explore theory use in PA interventions. Methods: Studies (N = 11) were identified through a systematic review and targeted African American/Hispanic adults, specific psychosocial factors, and PA. Data were extracted using a standard code sheet and the Theory Coding Scheme. Results: Social support was the most common psychosocial factor reported, followed by motivational readiness, and self-efficacy, as being associated with increased PA. Only 7 studies explicitly reported using a theoretical framework. Conclusions: Future efforts should explore theory use in PA interventions and how integration of theoretical constructs, including psychosocial factors, increases PA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

psychosocial factors
minority
Exercise
Psychology
Self Efficacy
Hispanic Americans
Social Support
African Americans
national minority
self-efficacy
social support
coding

Keywords

  • Cognitive aspects
  • Exercise
  • Social environment
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Mama, S. K., McNeill, L. H., McCurdy, S. A., Evans, A. E., Diamond, P. M., Adamus-Leach, H. J., & Lee, R. (2015). Psychosocial factors and theory in physical activity studies in minorities. American Journal of Health Behavior, 39(1), 68-76. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.39.1.8

Psychosocial factors and theory in physical activity studies in minorities. / Mama, Scherezade K.; McNeill, Lorna H.; McCurdy, Sheryl A.; Evans, Alexandra E.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Adamus-Leach, Heather J.; Lee, Rebecca.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 68-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mama, SK, McNeill, LH, McCurdy, SA, Evans, AE, Diamond, PM, Adamus-Leach, HJ & Lee, R 2015, 'Psychosocial factors and theory in physical activity studies in minorities', American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 68-76. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.39.1.8
Mama SK, McNeill LH, McCurdy SA, Evans AE, Diamond PM, Adamus-Leach HJ et al. Psychosocial factors and theory in physical activity studies in minorities. American Journal of Health Behavior. 2015 Jan 1;39(1):68-76. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.39.1.8
Mama, Scherezade K. ; McNeill, Lorna H. ; McCurdy, Sheryl A. ; Evans, Alexandra E. ; Diamond, Pamela M. ; Adamus-Leach, Heather J. ; Lee, Rebecca. / Psychosocial factors and theory in physical activity studies in minorities. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 68-76.
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