Psychosocial Barriers to Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Uptake: The Roles of Heterosexual Self-Presentation, Sexual Risk, and Perceived Peer PrEP Use

Mike C. Parent, Nathaniel Woznicki, Frank R. Dillon, Keenan A. Pituch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Several challenges have emerged in ensuring uptake of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention. By applying the health belief model, the present study assessed associations between novel psychosocial variables and PrEP use among gay and bisexual men. Logistic regression analyses indicated that heterosexual self-presentation, sexual risk, PrEP conspiracy beliefs, and perceived peer PrEP use were positively associated with PrEP use. Greater understanding of the psychosocial barriers to PrEP use for unique at-risk populations can facilitate the development of socially informed prevention strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychology of Men and Masculinity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Health belief model
  • Heterosexual self-presentation
  • Peer use
  • Preexposure prophylaxis
  • Sexual risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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