Psychophysical properties of low-frequency hearing: Implications for perceiving speech and music via electric and acoustic stimulation

René H. Gifford, Michael Dorman, Christopher A. Brown

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have investigated the psychophysical properties of low-frequency hearing, both before and after implantation, to see if we can account for the benefit to speech understanding and melody recognition of adding acoustic stimulation to electric stimulation. In this paper, we review our work and the work of others and describe preliminary results not previously published. We show (a) that it is possible to preserve normal or near-normal nonlinear cochlear processing in the implanted ear following electric and acoustic stimulation surgery - though this is not the typical outcome; (b) that although low-frequency frequency selectivity is generally disrupted following implantation, some degree of frequency selectivity can be preserved, and (c) that neither nonlinear cochlear processing nor frequency selectivity in the acoustic hearing ear is correlated with the gain in speech understanding afforded by combined electric and acoustic stimulation. In another set of experiments, we show that the value of preserving hearing in the implanted ear is best seen in complex listening environments in which binaural cues can play a role in perception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCochlear Implants and Hearing Preservation
EditorsPaul Heyning, Andrea Punte
Pages51-60
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Publication series

NameAdvances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Volume67
ISSN (Print)0065-3071

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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    Gifford, R. H., Dorman, M., & Brown, C. A. (2010). Psychophysical properties of low-frequency hearing: Implications for perceiving speech and music via electric and acoustic stimulation. In P. Heyning, & A. Punte (Eds.), Cochlear Implants and Hearing Preservation (pp. 51-60). (Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology; Vol. 67). https://doi.org/10.1159/000262596