Psychology, Public Policy, and Law Adopts Further Open Science Practices and Refreshes Its Commitment to Generalizable Empirical Research

Michael E. Lamb, Nancy K. Steblay, Tess M.S. Neal

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

Abstract

Psychology, Public Policy, and Law’s (PPPL) mission is to derive lessons and implications for practice from empirical research. To ensure that the applications to policy and law are wellfounded and are likely to have enduring relevance, it is especially important that the relevant research be of the highest possible quality, yielding findings that are clear, robust, and replicable. For that reason, many otherwise meritorious articles that would be publishable in other top-tier journals are rejected by PPPL because aspects of the sampling and methodology too grievously limit the generalizability of the findings and conclusions. In common with other journals, furthermore, PPPL has been put on notice about questionable, unscrupulous, and nontransparent research practices that have led to the retraction of some research reports (none in this journal) and have fostered skepticism about the veracity and reliability of psychological science

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-294
Number of pages2
JournalPsychology, Public Policy, and Law
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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