Provoked by a peer

Children's anger-related responses and their relations to social functioning

Bridget C. Murphy, Nancy Eisenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children's (n = 108) angry conflict incidents were examined in detail. Boys and girls, ages 7 to 11, described actual angry conflicts with peers and were questioned about the causes of their anger, their goals, and strategies. Further, relations of anger-related internal and behavioral reactions to children's social functioning (i.e., adults' ratings of children's self-regulation, emotional intensity, and social competence) were examined. Boys high in social functioning tended to report constructive goals and children high in social functioning tended to report constructive strategies. After the effects of the situation (cause of anger), sex, and age were controlled, social functioning contributed unique variance to the prediction of constructive goals but not constructive strategies. There were few effects of age, although sex differences were found.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-124
Number of pages22
JournalMerrill-Palmer Quarterly
Volume42
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1996

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Anger
anger
cause
social competence
self-regulation
Sex Characteristics
incident
rating
Conflict (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Provoked by a peer : Children's anger-related responses and their relations to social functioning. / Murphy, Bridget C.; Eisenberg, Nancy.

In: Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.1996, p. 103-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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