Abstract

The Lowry and Bradford assays are appropriate for untreated or poorly treated wastewaters, but are not sensitive enough for low protein concentrations such as found in reclaimed waters or drinking waters. A biomedical assay, NanoOrange® (Molecular Probes Inc., OR) which has been used to measure protein content in cells, is very sensitive, but exhibited interferences from salts in water, especially from divalent ions. As such it is of limited use for bulk drinking water samples, but could be used on samples after dialysis pretreatment. For natural organic matter (NOM) isolates and cloud samples, the NanoOrange® method could be used without concern for salts. The colloidal fraction of NOM exhibited the highest protein content based upon the NanoOrange® reagent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality
Pages663-666
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2007
EventWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality - Charlotte, NC, United States
Duration: Nov 4 2007Nov 8 2007

Other

OtherWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality
CountryUnited States
CityCharlotte, NC
Period11/4/0711/8/07

Fingerprint

Potable water
Assays
drinking water
assay
Proteins
water
Biological materials
protein
Salts
salt
Water
organic matter
Dialysis
Wastewater
probe
chronic illness
wastewater
interference
ion
Ions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Lee, W., & Westerhoff, P. (2007). Protein assay in drinking water and reclaimed water. In American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality (pp. 663-666)

Protein assay in drinking water and reclaimed water. / Lee, Wontae; Westerhoff, Paul.

American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality. 2007. p. 663-666.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lee, W & Westerhoff, P 2007, Protein assay in drinking water and reclaimed water. in American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality. pp. 663-666, Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality, Charlotte, NC, United States, 11/4/07.
Lee W, Westerhoff P. Protein assay in drinking water and reclaimed water. In American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality. 2007. p. 663-666
Lee, Wontae ; Westerhoff, Paul. / Protein assay in drinking water and reclaimed water. American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality. 2007. pp. 663-666
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