Prospective predictors of long-term abstinence versus relapse among smokers who quit as young adults

Jonathan T. Macy, Dong Chul Seo, Laurie Chassin, Clark Presson, Steven J. Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We sought to identify prospective predictors of long-term abstinence versus relapse among individuals who quit smoking as young adults. Methods. Participants from an ongoing longitudinal study of smoking who had quit for at least 1 year between the ages of 18 and 24 years (n=327) were divided into those who later reported not smoking for more than 5 years (long-term abstinence) or reported current smoking, defined as smoking at least monthly (relapse). Logistic regression was used to examine odds ratios (ORs) of prospective predictors of long-term abstinence versus relapse. Results. Overall, 67% of participants maintained long-term abstinence and 33% relapsed. The strongest predictor of avoiding relapse was marrying a nonsmoker (adjusted OR [AOR]=0.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.03, 0.21). Other predictors included making 1 lifetime quit attempt (AOR=0.13; 95% CI=0.04, 0.44), having as a young adult only 1 parent who smoked (AOR=0.23; 95% CI=0.06, 0.93), and working in a completely smoke-free building (AOR=0.13; 95% CI=0.03, 0.58). Conclusions. The factors related to smoking in the social environment played the largest role in predicting long-term abstinence versus relapse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1470-1475
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume97
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 8 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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