Procedural justice, police legitimacy, and helping the police fight crime: Results from a survey of Jamaican adolescents

Michael Reisig, Camille Lloyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

176 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drawing on procedural justice theory and research, this study uses survey data from a sample of Jamaican high school students (N = 289) to evaluate hypotheses derived from the process-based model of policing. Findings reveal that the correlation between procedural justice judgments and police legitimacy is positive and statistically significant. Students who rate police practices more favorably in terms of procedural justice also report a greater willingness to help the police fight crime (e.g., report suspicious activity to the police) in their community. In combination, the findings show that these two key process-based model hypotheses generalize to the Jamaican context. Although the correlation between police legitimacy and behavioral cooperation is in the expected direction, the relationship is not statistically significant. The findings also show that students from impoverished local communities dominated by ĝ€area donsĝ€ are less willing to help the police fight crime.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-62
Number of pages21
JournalPolice Quarterly
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

Keywords

  • Area dons
  • Jamaica
  • Legitimacy
  • Police
  • Procedural justice
  • West Indies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Law

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