Problems recruiting volunteers: Nature versus nurture

Mark Hager, Jeffrey L. Brudney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a national study of public charities in the United States, we find that some organizations experience little difficulty recruiting volunteers while others report substantial problems. We study which organizations are more likely to report recruitment problems, separating the underlying forces for those problems into two camps. One, which we label "nature," represents organizational conditions that cannot readily be overcome by a management response. The other, which we label "nurture," represents organizational conditions that volunteer resource managers and other members of the top management team can directly influence as they seek to make their organization more inviting to prospective volunteers. We find some support for both camps, concluding that managers must be prepared to work with both immutable and malleable conditions when devising strategies for recruiting volunteers whose schedule and skills fit the organization's needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-157
Number of pages21
JournalNonprofit Management and Leadership
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Nature
Recruiting
Volunteers
Managers
Top management teams
Resources
Organization studies
Schedule
Charity

Keywords

  • Volunteer management
  • Volunteer recruitment
  • Volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Problems recruiting volunteers : Nature versus nurture. / Hager, Mark; Brudney, Jeffrey L.

In: Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Vol. 22, No. 2, 12.2011, p. 137-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hager, Mark ; Brudney, Jeffrey L. / Problems recruiting volunteers : Nature versus nurture. In: Nonprofit Management and Leadership. 2011 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 137-157.
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