Probation revocation: A proportional hazards model of the conditioning effects of social disadvantage

Celesta A. Albonetti, John R. Hepburn

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    25 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Most studies find that offender's age, gender, ethnicity, prior arrest record, severity of the current offense and level of supervision significantly influence time to probation failure. There is little evidence to show that treatment interventions significantly affect either the likelihood of failure or the time to failure. We propose that an offender's prior record and lower education level - indicators of social disadvantage - directly affect the mean time to a probation revocation. Further, we suggest that social disadvantage may condition the effects of other offender characteristics, incident offense characteristics, and treatment intervention on failure time. Using a proportional hazards model of probation revocation, we find that intervention increases the risk of failure, as well as partial support for our hypothesis of the conditioning effect of offender's social disadvantage.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)124-138
    Number of pages15
    JournalSocial Problems
    Volume44
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 1997

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

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