Probabilistic fatigue life prediction considering short crack growth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A new methodology for probabilistic life prediction is proposed in this paper. Short crack growth is included into the proposed methodology using the equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS) concept. The proposed methodology is based on the Kitagawa-Takahashi diagram and only uses fatigue limit and fatigue crack threshold stress intensity factor. Unlike the commonly used back-extrapolation method for EIFS calculation, the proposed methodology is independent of applied load level and is very efficient in calculating the statistics of EIFS. The advantage of the developed EIFS concept is that an accurate fatigue life prediction can be obtained without complicated micro-mechanics analysis of small crack growth. The developed EIFS methodology is combined with probabilistic crack growth analysis to predict the fatigue life distribution of smooth specimens. Model predictions are compared with experimental observations for various metallic materials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th International Conference on Fracture 2009, ICF-12
Pages1936-1945
Number of pages10
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event12th International Conference on Fracture 2009, ICF-12 - Ottawa, ON, Canada
Duration: Jul 12 2009Jul 17 2009

Publication series

Name12th International Conference on Fracture 2009, ICF-12
Volume3

Other

Other12th International Conference on Fracture 2009, ICF-12
CountryCanada
CityOttawa, ON
Period7/12/097/17/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Probabilistic fatigue life prediction considering short crack growth'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Liu, Y. (2009). Probabilistic fatigue life prediction considering short crack growth. In 12th International Conference on Fracture 2009, ICF-12 (pp. 1936-1945). (12th International Conference on Fracture 2009, ICF-12; Vol. 3).