Proactive socialization and behavioral self-management

Alan M. Saks, Blake Ashforth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine behavioral self-management as a form of newcomer proactive socialization behavior. A longitudinal field study was conducted with a sample of 153 entry-level professionals who completed questionnaires during their first month of entry and 6 months after entry. The results indicated that self-management behavior was related to newcomers' general anxiety and stress at entry, and to internal motivation, ability to cope, and task-specific anxiety 6 months later. In addition, anxiety and stress at entry were found to mediate the relationships between self-management and ability to cope and task-specific anxiety. The research and practical implications of these findings are discussed. It is recommended that future research integrate the self-management and information seeking perspectives to provide a more complete theory of proactive socialization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-323
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Socialization
Self Care
socialization
Anxiety
anxiety
Aptitude
management
entry level
ability
Longitudinal Studies
Motivation
Self-management
questionnaire
Research
Newcomers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Applied Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Proactive socialization and behavioral self-management. / Saks, Alan M.; Ashforth, Blake.

In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 48, No. 3, 06.1996, p. 301-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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