Privileged but pressured? A study of affluent youth

Suniya Luthar, Bronwyn E. Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

160 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to build on preliminary findings of unusually high internalizing symptoms and substance use among suburban high school students. The sample consisted of 302 sixth- and seventh-grade students in an affluent, suburban community. Findings corroborated expectations regarding several domains of vulnerability, showing (1) high rates of clinically significant depressive symptoms among older girls, (2) significant links between various internalizing symptoms and substance use among both boys and girls, and (3) peers' approval of substance use among older boys. In exploring potential causes of distress in this suburban sample, associations were found for achievement pressures (particularly excessive perfectionistic strivings), and isolation from parents (particularly low perceived closeness to mothers). Findings of this study are discussed in terms of widespread stereotypes about affluent families, as well as implications for future research and preventive interventions for a subgroup of youth typically viewed as being at "low risk".

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1593-1610
Number of pages18
JournalChild Development
Volume73
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Students
stereotype
social isolation
vulnerability
parents
student
Parents
Mothers
Depression
Pressure
cause
school
community

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Privileged but pressured? A study of affluent youth. / Luthar, Suniya; Becker, Bronwyn E.

In: Child Development, Vol. 73, No. 5, 09.2002, p. 1593-1610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luthar, S & Becker, BE 2002, 'Privileged but pressured? A study of affluent youth', Child Development, vol. 73, no. 5, pp. 1593-1610.
Luthar, Suniya ; Becker, Bronwyn E. / Privileged but pressured? A study of affluent youth. In: Child Development. 2002 ; Vol. 73, No. 5. pp. 1593-1610.
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