Prevention of Firearm Injuries among Children and Adolescents: Consensus-Driven Research Agenda from the Firearm Safety among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium

Rebecca M. Cunningham, Patrick M. Carter, Megan L. Ranney, Maureen Walton, April M. Zeoli, Elizabeth R. Alpern, Charles Branas, Rinad S. Beidas, Peter F. Ehrlich, Monika K. Goyal, Jason E. Goldstick, David Hemenway, Stephen W. Hargarten, Cheryl A. King, Lynn Massey, Quyen Ngo, Jesenia Pizarro-Terrill, Lisa Prosser, Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, Fredrick RivaraLaney A. Rupp, Eric Sigel, Jukka Savolainen, Marc A. Zimmerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Importance: Firearm injuries are the second leading cause of death among US children and adolescents. Because of the lack of resources allocated to firearm injury prevention during the past 25 years, research has lagged behind other areas of injury prevention. Identifying timely and important research questions regarding firearm injury prevention is a critical step for reducing pediatric mortality. Objective: The Firearm Safety Among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium, a National Institute for Child Health and Human Development-funded group of scientists and stakeholders, was formed in 2017 to develop research resources for the field, including a pediatric-specific research agenda for firearm injury prevention to assist future researchers and funders, as well as to inform cross-disciplinary evidence-based research on this critical injury prevention topic. Evidence Review: A nominal group technique process was used, including 4 key steps (idea generation, round-robin, clarification, and voting and consensus). During idea generation, stakeholders and workgroups generated initial research agenda topics after conducting scoping reviews of the literature to identify existing gaps in knowledge. Agenda topics were refined through 6 rounds of discussion and survey feedback (ie, round-robin, and clarification steps). Final voting (using a 5-point Likert scale) was conducted to achieve consensus (≥70% of consortium ranking items at 4 or 5 priority for inclusion) around key research priorities for the next 5 years of research in this field. Final agenda questions were reviewed by both the stakeholder group and an external panel of research experts not affiliated with the FACTS Consortium. Feedback was integrated and the final set of agenda items was ratified by the entire FACTS Consortium. Findings: Overall, 26 priority agenda items with examples of specific research questions were identified across 5 major thematic areas, including epidemiology and risk and protective factors, primary prevention, secondary prevention and sequelae, cross-cutting prevention factors, policy, and data enhancement. Conclusions and Relevance: These priority agenda items, when taken together, define a comprehensive pediatric-specific firearm injury prevention research agenda that will guide research resource allocation within this field during the next 5 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJAMA Pediatrics
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Firearms
Consensus
Safety
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Songbirds
Politics
Pediatrics
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.)
Group Processes
Resource Allocation
Primary Prevention
Secondary Prevention
Cause of Death
Epidemiology
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Prevention of Firearm Injuries among Children and Adolescents : Consensus-Driven Research Agenda from the Firearm Safety among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium. / Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Carter, Patrick M.; Ranney, Megan L.; Walton, Maureen; Zeoli, April M.; Alpern, Elizabeth R.; Branas, Charles; Beidas, Rinad S.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Goyal, Monika K.; Goldstick, Jason E.; Hemenway, David; Hargarten, Stephen W.; King, Cheryl A.; Massey, Lynn; Ngo, Quyen; Pizarro-Terrill, Jesenia; Prosser, Lisa; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Rivara, Fredrick; Rupp, Laney A.; Sigel, Eric; Savolainen, Jukka; Zimmerman, Marc A.

In: JAMA Pediatrics, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cunningham, RM, Carter, PM, Ranney, ML, Walton, M, Zeoli, AM, Alpern, ER, Branas, C, Beidas, RS, Ehrlich, PF, Goyal, MK, Goldstick, JE, Hemenway, D, Hargarten, SW, King, CA, Massey, L, Ngo, Q, Pizarro-Terrill, J, Prosser, L, Rowhani-Rahbar, A, Rivara, F, Rupp, LA, Sigel, E, Savolainen, J & Zimmerman, MA 2019, 'Prevention of Firearm Injuries among Children and Adolescents: Consensus-Driven Research Agenda from the Firearm Safety among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium', JAMA Pediatrics. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.1494
Cunningham, Rebecca M. ; Carter, Patrick M. ; Ranney, Megan L. ; Walton, Maureen ; Zeoli, April M. ; Alpern, Elizabeth R. ; Branas, Charles ; Beidas, Rinad S. ; Ehrlich, Peter F. ; Goyal, Monika K. ; Goldstick, Jason E. ; Hemenway, David ; Hargarten, Stephen W. ; King, Cheryl A. ; Massey, Lynn ; Ngo, Quyen ; Pizarro-Terrill, Jesenia ; Prosser, Lisa ; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali ; Rivara, Fredrick ; Rupp, Laney A. ; Sigel, Eric ; Savolainen, Jukka ; Zimmerman, Marc A. / Prevention of Firearm Injuries among Children and Adolescents : Consensus-Driven Research Agenda from the Firearm Safety among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium. In: JAMA Pediatrics. 2019.
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abstract = "Importance: Firearm injuries are the second leading cause of death among US children and adolescents. Because of the lack of resources allocated to firearm injury prevention during the past 25 years, research has lagged behind other areas of injury prevention. Identifying timely and important research questions regarding firearm injury prevention is a critical step for reducing pediatric mortality. Objective: The Firearm Safety Among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium, a National Institute for Child Health and Human Development-funded group of scientists and stakeholders, was formed in 2017 to develop research resources for the field, including a pediatric-specific research agenda for firearm injury prevention to assist future researchers and funders, as well as to inform cross-disciplinary evidence-based research on this critical injury prevention topic. Evidence Review: A nominal group technique process was used, including 4 key steps (idea generation, round-robin, clarification, and voting and consensus). During idea generation, stakeholders and workgroups generated initial research agenda topics after conducting scoping reviews of the literature to identify existing gaps in knowledge. Agenda topics were refined through 6 rounds of discussion and survey feedback (ie, round-robin, and clarification steps). Final voting (using a 5-point Likert scale) was conducted to achieve consensus (≥70{\%} of consortium ranking items at 4 or 5 priority for inclusion) around key research priorities for the next 5 years of research in this field. Final agenda questions were reviewed by both the stakeholder group and an external panel of research experts not affiliated with the FACTS Consortium. Feedback was integrated and the final set of agenda items was ratified by the entire FACTS Consortium. Findings: Overall, 26 priority agenda items with examples of specific research questions were identified across 5 major thematic areas, including epidemiology and risk and protective factors, primary prevention, secondary prevention and sequelae, cross-cutting prevention factors, policy, and data enhancement. Conclusions and Relevance: These priority agenda items, when taken together, define a comprehensive pediatric-specific firearm injury prevention research agenda that will guide research resource allocation within this field during the next 5 years.",
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T2 - Consensus-Driven Research Agenda from the Firearm Safety among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium

AU - Cunningham, Rebecca M.

AU - Carter, Patrick M.

AU - Ranney, Megan L.

AU - Walton, Maureen

AU - Zeoli, April M.

AU - Alpern, Elizabeth R.

AU - Branas, Charles

AU - Beidas, Rinad S.

AU - Ehrlich, Peter F.

AU - Goyal, Monika K.

AU - Goldstick, Jason E.

AU - Hemenway, David

AU - Hargarten, Stephen W.

AU - King, Cheryl A.

AU - Massey, Lynn

AU - Ngo, Quyen

AU - Pizarro-Terrill, Jesenia

AU - Prosser, Lisa

AU - Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali

AU - Rivara, Fredrick

AU - Rupp, Laney A.

AU - Sigel, Eric

AU - Savolainen, Jukka

AU - Zimmerman, Marc A.

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N2 - Importance: Firearm injuries are the second leading cause of death among US children and adolescents. Because of the lack of resources allocated to firearm injury prevention during the past 25 years, research has lagged behind other areas of injury prevention. Identifying timely and important research questions regarding firearm injury prevention is a critical step for reducing pediatric mortality. Objective: The Firearm Safety Among Children and Teens (FACTS) Consortium, a National Institute for Child Health and Human Development-funded group of scientists and stakeholders, was formed in 2017 to develop research resources for the field, including a pediatric-specific research agenda for firearm injury prevention to assist future researchers and funders, as well as to inform cross-disciplinary evidence-based research on this critical injury prevention topic. Evidence Review: A nominal group technique process was used, including 4 key steps (idea generation, round-robin, clarification, and voting and consensus). During idea generation, stakeholders and workgroups generated initial research agenda topics after conducting scoping reviews of the literature to identify existing gaps in knowledge. Agenda topics were refined through 6 rounds of discussion and survey feedback (ie, round-robin, and clarification steps). Final voting (using a 5-point Likert scale) was conducted to achieve consensus (≥70% of consortium ranking items at 4 or 5 priority for inclusion) around key research priorities for the next 5 years of research in this field. Final agenda questions were reviewed by both the stakeholder group and an external panel of research experts not affiliated with the FACTS Consortium. Feedback was integrated and the final set of agenda items was ratified by the entire FACTS Consortium. Findings: Overall, 26 priority agenda items with examples of specific research questions were identified across 5 major thematic areas, including epidemiology and risk and protective factors, primary prevention, secondary prevention and sequelae, cross-cutting prevention factors, policy, and data enhancement. Conclusions and Relevance: These priority agenda items, when taken together, define a comprehensive pediatric-specific firearm injury prevention research agenda that will guide research resource allocation within this field during the next 5 years.

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