Prenatal tobacco exposure and infant stress reactivity

Role of child sex and maternal behavior

Rina D. Eiden, Danielle S. Molnar, Douglas A. Granger, Craig R. Colder, Pamela Schuetze, Marilyn A. Huestis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the association between prenatal tobacco exposure (PTE) and infant cortisol reactivity at 9 months of infant age. Child sex and maternal parenting behavior were hypothesized moderators. The sample included 217 (148 tobacco-exposed, 69 non-exposed) mother-child dyads. Data used were obtained from pregnancy assessments, mother-infant feeding interactions at 2 months, and salivary cortisol at four time points in response to frustration at 9 months. Results indicated a significant association between PTE and infant cortisol that was moderated by infant sex and maternal intrusiveness. That is, PTE boys had lower cortisol than control boys, but there was no association between PTE and cortisol among girls. There was a significant association between PTE and cortisol among infants of intrusive mothers, but not among infants with non-intrusive mothers. Thus, PTE was associated with cortisol hypo-reactivity such that boys and non-exposed infants experiencing high maternal intrusiveness were at greater risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-225
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Maternal Behavior
Child Behavior
Sexual Behavior
Tobacco
Hydrocortisone
Mothers
Mother-Child Relations
Frustration
Parenting
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Infant cortisol
  • Mother-infant interactions
  • Prenatal tobacco exposure
  • Sex differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Eiden, R. D., Molnar, D. S., Granger, D. A., Colder, C. R., Schuetze, P., & Huestis, M. A. (2015). Prenatal tobacco exposure and infant stress reactivity: Role of child sex and maternal behavior. Developmental Psychobiology, 57(2), 212-225. https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.21284

Prenatal tobacco exposure and infant stress reactivity : Role of child sex and maternal behavior. / Eiden, Rina D.; Molnar, Danielle S.; Granger, Douglas A.; Colder, Craig R.; Schuetze, Pamela; Huestis, Marilyn A.

In: Developmental Psychobiology, Vol. 57, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 212-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eiden, RD, Molnar, DS, Granger, DA, Colder, CR, Schuetze, P & Huestis, MA 2015, 'Prenatal tobacco exposure and infant stress reactivity: Role of child sex and maternal behavior', Developmental Psychobiology, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 212-225. https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.21284
Eiden, Rina D. ; Molnar, Danielle S. ; Granger, Douglas A. ; Colder, Craig R. ; Schuetze, Pamela ; Huestis, Marilyn A. / Prenatal tobacco exposure and infant stress reactivity : Role of child sex and maternal behavior. In: Developmental Psychobiology. 2015 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 212-225.
@article{a5dbfb4fe2bf42f9a97db7c5a43b0d89,
title = "Prenatal tobacco exposure and infant stress reactivity: Role of child sex and maternal behavior",
abstract = "This study examined the association between prenatal tobacco exposure (PTE) and infant cortisol reactivity at 9 months of infant age. Child sex and maternal parenting behavior were hypothesized moderators. The sample included 217 (148 tobacco-exposed, 69 non-exposed) mother-child dyads. Data used were obtained from pregnancy assessments, mother-infant feeding interactions at 2 months, and salivary cortisol at four time points in response to frustration at 9 months. Results indicated a significant association between PTE and infant cortisol that was moderated by infant sex and maternal intrusiveness. That is, PTE boys had lower cortisol than control boys, but there was no association between PTE and cortisol among girls. There was a significant association between PTE and cortisol among infants of intrusive mothers, but not among infants with non-intrusive mothers. Thus, PTE was associated with cortisol hypo-reactivity such that boys and non-exposed infants experiencing high maternal intrusiveness were at greater risk.",
keywords = "Infant cortisol, Mother-infant interactions, Prenatal tobacco exposure, Sex differences",
author = "Eiden, {Rina D.} and Molnar, {Danielle S.} and Granger, {Douglas A.} and Colder, {Craig R.} and Pamela Schuetze and Huestis, {Marilyn A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/dev.21284",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "212--225",
journal = "Developmental Psychobiology",
issn = "0012-1630",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prenatal tobacco exposure and infant stress reactivity

T2 - Role of child sex and maternal behavior

AU - Eiden, Rina D.

AU - Molnar, Danielle S.

AU - Granger, Douglas A.

AU - Colder, Craig R.

AU - Schuetze, Pamela

AU - Huestis, Marilyn A.

PY - 2015/3/1

Y1 - 2015/3/1

N2 - This study examined the association between prenatal tobacco exposure (PTE) and infant cortisol reactivity at 9 months of infant age. Child sex and maternal parenting behavior were hypothesized moderators. The sample included 217 (148 tobacco-exposed, 69 non-exposed) mother-child dyads. Data used were obtained from pregnancy assessments, mother-infant feeding interactions at 2 months, and salivary cortisol at four time points in response to frustration at 9 months. Results indicated a significant association between PTE and infant cortisol that was moderated by infant sex and maternal intrusiveness. That is, PTE boys had lower cortisol than control boys, but there was no association between PTE and cortisol among girls. There was a significant association between PTE and cortisol among infants of intrusive mothers, but not among infants with non-intrusive mothers. Thus, PTE was associated with cortisol hypo-reactivity such that boys and non-exposed infants experiencing high maternal intrusiveness were at greater risk.

AB - This study examined the association between prenatal tobacco exposure (PTE) and infant cortisol reactivity at 9 months of infant age. Child sex and maternal parenting behavior were hypothesized moderators. The sample included 217 (148 tobacco-exposed, 69 non-exposed) mother-child dyads. Data used were obtained from pregnancy assessments, mother-infant feeding interactions at 2 months, and salivary cortisol at four time points in response to frustration at 9 months. Results indicated a significant association between PTE and infant cortisol that was moderated by infant sex and maternal intrusiveness. That is, PTE boys had lower cortisol than control boys, but there was no association between PTE and cortisol among girls. There was a significant association between PTE and cortisol among infants of intrusive mothers, but not among infants with non-intrusive mothers. Thus, PTE was associated with cortisol hypo-reactivity such that boys and non-exposed infants experiencing high maternal intrusiveness were at greater risk.

KW - Infant cortisol

KW - Mother-infant interactions

KW - Prenatal tobacco exposure

KW - Sex differences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923069673&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84923069673&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/dev.21284

DO - 10.1002/dev.21284

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 212

EP - 225

JO - Developmental Psychobiology

JF - Developmental Psychobiology

SN - 0012-1630

IS - 2

ER -