Prematurity and perinatal adversity effects hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity to social evaluative threat in adulthood

Mary C. Sullivan, Suzy B. Winchester, Crystal I. Bryce, Douglas Granger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the long-term effects of prematurity and perinatal adversity on individual differences in stress-related reactivity and regulation of the HPA axis. A prospective sample of 155 infants born preterm and healthy (n = 20), medical illness (n = 48), neurological illness (n = 26), and small for gestational age (n = 24) and full-term (n = 37) were recruited between 1985 and 1989. At age 23 years, multiple saliva samples were collected before and after participation in the Trier Social Stress Test and later assayed for cortisol. Results reveal that at age 23 years, infants born premature with neurological complications showed higher cortisol reactivity to social evaluative threat compared to either their full-term, small for gestation age, medically ill, or healthy preterm peers. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for contemporary theories that propose effects of early adversity on biological sensitivities and susceptibilities, which translate experience into developmental outcomes related to poor health and risk for disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)976-983
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental psychobiology
Volume59
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cortisol
  • pre-perinatal adversity
  • prematurity
  • stress
  • TSST

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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