Premature adolescent autonomy

Parent disengagement and deviant peer process in the amplification of problem behaviour

Thomas J. Dishion, Sarah E. Nelson, Bernadette Marie Bullock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

256 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Premature autonomy describes a developmental dynamic where parents of high-risk adolescents reduce their involvement and guidance when confronted with challenges of problem behaviour and the influence of deviant friendships. This dynamic was tested on the sample of Oregon Youth Study boys (N=206), whose family management practices and friendships were observed on videotaped interaction tasks. Latent growth curve models were used to examine longitudinal trends between deviant friendship interactions and family management. Direct observations of deviant friendship process at age 14 were associated with degradation in family management during adolescence. A comparison of antisocial and well-adjusted boys clarified that parents of antisocial boys (started early and persisted) decreased family management around puberty, in comparison to parents of well-adjusted boys who maintained high levels of family management through adolescence. In predicting late adolescent problem behaviour, there was a statistically reliable interaction between family management degradation and deviant peer involvement in adolescence in support of the premature autonomy hypothesis. Adolescent males involved in deviant friendships, and whose parents decreased their family management, were most likely to use marijuana and commit antisocial acts at age 18. The implications for interventions that target adolescents are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-530
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Parents
Adolescent Behavior
Family Practice
Cannabis
Puberty
Problem Behavior
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Premature adolescent autonomy : Parent disengagement and deviant peer process in the amplification of problem behaviour. / Dishion, Thomas J.; Nelson, Sarah E.; Bullock, Bernadette Marie.

In: Journal of Adolescence, Vol. 27, No. 5, 10.2004, p. 515-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dishion, Thomas J. ; Nelson, Sarah E. ; Bullock, Bernadette Marie. / Premature adolescent autonomy : Parent disengagement and deviant peer process in the amplification of problem behaviour. In: Journal of Adolescence. 2004 ; Vol. 27, No. 5. pp. 515-530.
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