Abstract

We examined whether adolescents required greater prenatal weight gains than nonadolescents to deliver equal weight babies following a low-risk pregnancy. Maternal characteristics and monthly weight gains were collected from medical records obtained from a private health maintenance organization (n = 423). Maternal weight gain, gestational age, parity, and cigarette use during pregnancy were significant predictors of infant birth weight in our regression models. Subjects were nonsmokers with a gestational age greater than 37 weeks and a parity equal to 0 who entered prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy. Mean total weight gains for the adolescents (16.2 ± 4.8 kg; n = 51) and adults (15.2 ± 5.4 kg; n = 65), and infant birth weights were similar. Mean infant birth weight was 3473 ± 394 g for the adolescents and 3339 ± 453 g for the young adults, whereas the optimal weight range for newborns is about 3500-3999 g. Modifiable risks are the important predictors of infant birth weight, and adolescents do not appear to require a greater weight gain than young adults to deliver similar weight babies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-189
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

young adults
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Birth Weight
birth weight
weight gain
pregnancy
Pregnancy
gestational age
infants
parity (reproduction)
Parity
Weights and Measures
Gestational Age
Mothers
prenatal care
Prenatal Care
Health Maintenance Organizations
cigarettes
First Pregnancy Trimester

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Pregnancy weight gain in adolescents and young adults. / Johnston, Carol; Christopher, F. S.; Kandell, L. A.

In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 10, No. 3, 1991, p. 185-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnston, C, Christopher, FS & Kandell, LA 1991, 'Pregnancy weight gain in adolescents and young adults', Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 185-189.
Johnston, Carol ; Christopher, F. S. ; Kandell, L. A. / Pregnancy weight gain in adolescents and young adults. In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 1991 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 185-189.
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