Predictors of fat mass changes in response to aerobic exercise training in women

Brandon J. Sawyer, Dharini M. Bhammar, Siddhartha Angadi, Dana M. Ryan, Justin R. Ryder, Elizabeth J. Sussman, Farryl M W Bertmann, Glenn Gaesser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aerobic exercise training in women typically results in minimal fat loss, with considerable individual variability. We hypothesized that women with higher baseline body fat would lose more body fat in response to exercise training and that early fat loss would predict final fat loss. Eighty-one sedentary premenopausal women (age: 30.7 ± 7.8 years; height: 164.5 ± 7.4 cm; weight: 68.2 ± 16.4 kg; fat percent: 38.1 ± 8.8) underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry before and after 12 weeks of supervised treadmill walking 3 days per week for 30 minutes at 70% of VO2peak. Overall, women did not lose body weight or fat mass. However, considerable individual variability was observed for changes in body weight (-11.7 to +4.8 kg) and fat mass (-11.8 to +3.7 kg). Fifty-five women were classified as compensators and, as a group, gained fat mass (25.6 ± 11.1 kg to 26.1 ± 11.3 kg; p < 0.001). The strongest correlates of change in body fat at 12 weeks were change in body weight (r = 0.52) and fat mass (r = 0.48) at 4 weeks. Stepwise regression analysis that included change in body weight and body fat at 4 weeks and submaximal exercise energy expenditure yielded a prediction model that explained 37% of the variance in fat mass change (R2 = 0.37, p < 0.001). Change in body weight and fat mass at 4 weeks were moderate predictors of fat loss and may potentially be useful for identification of individuals who achieve less than expected weight loss or experience unintended fat gain in response to exercise training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-304
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume29
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Fats
Exercise
Adipose Tissue
Body Weight Changes
Energy Metabolism
Walking
Weight Loss
Body Weight
Regression Analysis
X-Rays
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Compensation
  • Heterogeneity
  • Public health guidelines
  • Vigorous-intensity exercise
  • Walking
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Predictors of fat mass changes in response to aerobic exercise training in women. / Sawyer, Brandon J.; Bhammar, Dharini M.; Angadi, Siddhartha; Ryan, Dana M.; Ryder, Justin R.; Sussman, Elizabeth J.; Bertmann, Farryl M W; Gaesser, Glenn.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 297-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sawyer, BJ, Bhammar, DM, Angadi, S, Ryan, DM, Ryder, JR, Sussman, EJ, Bertmann, FMW & Gaesser, G 2015, 'Predictors of fat mass changes in response to aerobic exercise training in women', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 297-304.
Sawyer, Brandon J. ; Bhammar, Dharini M. ; Angadi, Siddhartha ; Ryan, Dana M. ; Ryder, Justin R. ; Sussman, Elizabeth J. ; Bertmann, Farryl M W ; Gaesser, Glenn. / Predictors of fat mass changes in response to aerobic exercise training in women. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 297-304.
@article{31da9c3f535941e1985f6aff2e85b365,
title = "Predictors of fat mass changes in response to aerobic exercise training in women",
abstract = "Aerobic exercise training in women typically results in minimal fat loss, with considerable individual variability. We hypothesized that women with higher baseline body fat would lose more body fat in response to exercise training and that early fat loss would predict final fat loss. Eighty-one sedentary premenopausal women (age: 30.7 ± 7.8 years; height: 164.5 ± 7.4 cm; weight: 68.2 ± 16.4 kg; fat percent: 38.1 ± 8.8) underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry before and after 12 weeks of supervised treadmill walking 3 days per week for 30 minutes at 70{\%} of VO2peak. Overall, women did not lose body weight or fat mass. However, considerable individual variability was observed for changes in body weight (-11.7 to +4.8 kg) and fat mass (-11.8 to +3.7 kg). Fifty-five women were classified as compensators and, as a group, gained fat mass (25.6 ± 11.1 kg to 26.1 ± 11.3 kg; p < 0.001). The strongest correlates of change in body fat at 12 weeks were change in body weight (r = 0.52) and fat mass (r = 0.48) at 4 weeks. Stepwise regression analysis that included change in body weight and body fat at 4 weeks and submaximal exercise energy expenditure yielded a prediction model that explained 37{\%} of the variance in fat mass change (R2 = 0.37, p < 0.001). Change in body weight and fat mass at 4 weeks were moderate predictors of fat loss and may potentially be useful for identification of individuals who achieve less than expected weight loss or experience unintended fat gain in response to exercise training.",
keywords = "Compensation, Heterogeneity, Public health guidelines, Vigorous-intensity exercise, Walking, Weight loss",
author = "Sawyer, {Brandon J.} and Bhammar, {Dharini M.} and Siddhartha Angadi and Ryan, {Dana M.} and Ryder, {Justin R.} and Sussman, {Elizabeth J.} and Bertmann, {Farryl M W} and Glenn Gaesser",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "297--304",
journal = "Strength and Conditioning Journal",
issn = "1524-1602",
publisher = "NSCA National Strength and Conditioning Association",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of fat mass changes in response to aerobic exercise training in women

AU - Sawyer, Brandon J.

AU - Bhammar, Dharini M.

AU - Angadi, Siddhartha

AU - Ryan, Dana M.

AU - Ryder, Justin R.

AU - Sussman, Elizabeth J.

AU - Bertmann, Farryl M W

AU - Gaesser, Glenn

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Aerobic exercise training in women typically results in minimal fat loss, with considerable individual variability. We hypothesized that women with higher baseline body fat would lose more body fat in response to exercise training and that early fat loss would predict final fat loss. Eighty-one sedentary premenopausal women (age: 30.7 ± 7.8 years; height: 164.5 ± 7.4 cm; weight: 68.2 ± 16.4 kg; fat percent: 38.1 ± 8.8) underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry before and after 12 weeks of supervised treadmill walking 3 days per week for 30 minutes at 70% of VO2peak. Overall, women did not lose body weight or fat mass. However, considerable individual variability was observed for changes in body weight (-11.7 to +4.8 kg) and fat mass (-11.8 to +3.7 kg). Fifty-five women were classified as compensators and, as a group, gained fat mass (25.6 ± 11.1 kg to 26.1 ± 11.3 kg; p < 0.001). The strongest correlates of change in body fat at 12 weeks were change in body weight (r = 0.52) and fat mass (r = 0.48) at 4 weeks. Stepwise regression analysis that included change in body weight and body fat at 4 weeks and submaximal exercise energy expenditure yielded a prediction model that explained 37% of the variance in fat mass change (R2 = 0.37, p < 0.001). Change in body weight and fat mass at 4 weeks were moderate predictors of fat loss and may potentially be useful for identification of individuals who achieve less than expected weight loss or experience unintended fat gain in response to exercise training.

AB - Aerobic exercise training in women typically results in minimal fat loss, with considerable individual variability. We hypothesized that women with higher baseline body fat would lose more body fat in response to exercise training and that early fat loss would predict final fat loss. Eighty-one sedentary premenopausal women (age: 30.7 ± 7.8 years; height: 164.5 ± 7.4 cm; weight: 68.2 ± 16.4 kg; fat percent: 38.1 ± 8.8) underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry before and after 12 weeks of supervised treadmill walking 3 days per week for 30 minutes at 70% of VO2peak. Overall, women did not lose body weight or fat mass. However, considerable individual variability was observed for changes in body weight (-11.7 to +4.8 kg) and fat mass (-11.8 to +3.7 kg). Fifty-five women were classified as compensators and, as a group, gained fat mass (25.6 ± 11.1 kg to 26.1 ± 11.3 kg; p < 0.001). The strongest correlates of change in body fat at 12 weeks were change in body weight (r = 0.52) and fat mass (r = 0.48) at 4 weeks. Stepwise regression analysis that included change in body weight and body fat at 4 weeks and submaximal exercise energy expenditure yielded a prediction model that explained 37% of the variance in fat mass change (R2 = 0.37, p < 0.001). Change in body weight and fat mass at 4 weeks were moderate predictors of fat loss and may potentially be useful for identification of individuals who achieve less than expected weight loss or experience unintended fat gain in response to exercise training.

KW - Compensation

KW - Heterogeneity

KW - Public health guidelines

KW - Vigorous-intensity exercise

KW - Walking

KW - Weight loss

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925945449&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925945449&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 25353081

AN - SCOPUS:84925945449

VL - 29

SP - 297

EP - 304

JO - Strength and Conditioning Journal

JF - Strength and Conditioning Journal

SN - 1524-1602

IS - 2

ER -