Predictors of Caregiver Participation in an Engagement Strategy to Increase Initiation into a Family-Based Preventive Intervention

Hardian Thamrin, Emily B. Winslow, Daisy E. Camacho-Thompson, Xochitl Arlene Smola, Alondra M. Cruz, Vanesa M. Perez, Sarah G. Hidalgo, Jenn Yun Tein, Nancy A. Gonzales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that engagement strategies can help increase enrollment and initiation of families in evidence-based preventive programs under natural service delivery settings. However, little is known about factors that predict completion of these engagement strategies. This study aimed to examine predictors (i.e., perceived need, perceived barriers, and sociocultural context) of caregiver participation in an evidence-based engagement call strategy. This call was expected to increase initiation into a school-based, family-focused prevention program. In addition, this study examined engagement call completion as a predictor of program initiation among already enrolled families. Participants included ethnically diverse families recruited from three Title I schools (n = 413) who were randomized to receive the prevention program. Results showed that interparental conflict—an indicator of perceived need—was associated with an increased likelihood of completing the engagement call. Furthermore, caregivers from low-socioeconomic status (SES), foreign-born, Spanish-speaking, Hispanic families were more likely to complete the call relative to those from low- and mid-SES, US born, English-speaking, ethnically diverse families. Importantly, engagement call completion was associated with an increased likelihood of program initiation. These findings provide limited support that families with higher perceived needs are more likely to participate in an evidence-based engagement call strategy. Results suggested that the call strategy provides a promising way to reduce attrition from family prevention programs, which is commonly observed between enrollment and initiation. Project Number: R01 DA035855; Date of Registration: 06/15/2014.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)880-890
Number of pages11
JournalPrevention Science
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Engagement
  • Family
  • Intervention
  • Prevention
  • School

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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