Predicting occupational role choices after involuntary job loss

Angelo J. Kinicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Involuntary job loss is not expected to abate and research has not examined the process by which displaced workers choose to pursue a work role (find another job) or nonwork role like retirement or going back to school. Longitudinal data were obtained from 126 employees 1 month prior to being permanently displaced. Within-subjects analyses then were used to test the ability of a behavioral choice model of motivation to predict behavioral intention to look for another job, effort in looking, and actual behavior/role choice 18 months later. The behavioral choice model significantly predicted all criteria. This study also investigated the determinants of displaced workers' expectancies for obtaining a new job. Expectancy for obtaining a job was inversely related with age, and positively with education, self-esteem, and the expectation of losing one's job. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-218
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

occupational role
Choice Behavior
job loss
Aptitude
Retirement
Self Concept
Motivation
Education
Research
role behavior
worker
retirement
self-esteem
employee
Job loss
determinants
ability
school
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Applied Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Predicting occupational role choices after involuntary job loss. / Kinicki, Angelo J.

In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 35, No. 2, 1989, p. 204-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kinicki, Angelo J. / Predicting occupational role choices after involuntary job loss. In: Journal of Vocational Behavior. 1989 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 204-218.
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