Predicted failure alerting in a supervisory control task does not always enhance performance

Robert S. Gutzwiller, Benjamin A. Clegg, C. A.P. Smith, Joanna E. Lewis, John D. Patterson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Many emerging technologies mandate supervisory control of automation, with operators monitoring and intervening within systems that change dynamically over time. Providing decision aiding to these operators at critical moments has the potential to improve performance. The current study employed a supervisory control task to examine the effects of supplying a secondary aid (an alert to a predicted automation failure) to task performance. The aid signified potential anomalies in automated planning, and was either present throughout training, or only after some task experience was obtained. The aid occasionally changed operator decision-making, but did not consistently improve task performance. Crucially, the presence of the aid did not improve operators' abilities to reject bad automated plans. Overall these results highlight a critical issue for the development of detection systems to effectively support future supervisory control activities, and the implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013
Pages364-368
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 30 2013Oct 4 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period9/30/1310/4/13

Fingerprint

automation
Automation
performance
system change
Decision making
monitoring
decision making
Planning
planning
Monitoring
ability
experience
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Gutzwiller, R. S., Clegg, B. A., Smith, C. A. P., Lewis, J. E., & Patterson, J. D. (2013). Predicted failure alerting in a supervisory control task does not always enhance performance. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013 (pp. 364-368). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213571079

Predicted failure alerting in a supervisory control task does not always enhance performance. / Gutzwiller, Robert S.; Clegg, Benjamin A.; Smith, C. A.P.; Lewis, Joanna E.; Patterson, John D.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013. 2013. p. 364-368 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gutzwiller, RS, Clegg, BA, Smith, CAP, Lewis, JE & Patterson, JD 2013, Predicted failure alerting in a supervisory control task does not always enhance performance. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, pp. 364-368, 57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013, San Diego, CA, United States, 9/30/13. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213571079
Gutzwiller RS, Clegg BA, Smith CAP, Lewis JE, Patterson JD. Predicted failure alerting in a supervisory control task does not always enhance performance. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013. 2013. p. 364-368. (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213571079
Gutzwiller, Robert S. ; Clegg, Benjamin A. ; Smith, C. A.P. ; Lewis, Joanna E. ; Patterson, John D. / Predicted failure alerting in a supervisory control task does not always enhance performance. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2013. 2013. pp. 364-368 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).
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