Potential effects of the Nagoya Protocol on the exchange of non-plant genetic resources for scientific research: Actors, paths, and consequences

Eric Welch, Eunjung Shin, Jennifer Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scholars have expressed concern that the Nagoya Protocol (NP) might hinder academic research by constraining the exchange and use of genetic resources (Jinnah and Jungcurt, 2009). This paper investigates current genetic resource exchange and use practices as a first step to better understand how the Protocol might affect US agricultural research. The paper addresses three main questions: (1) Who are the main actors sharing genetic resources in the US?; (2) What pathways exist for the exchange and how can they be characterized?; and (3) What consequences are expected to occur as a result of the potential implementation of the NP? Analysis of data from a 2011 national survey of government and university researchers shows that while many of the surveyed researchers are actively involved in exchange of genetic resources, few exchange large quantities of material. Pathways are best described as informal and based on expected reciprocity, and few report paying for genetic resources. While the use of material transfer agreements is low, use is associated with higher levels of expected reciprocity and intellectual property outcomes on projects. Conclusions discuss the implications of the findings for the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol and reflect on possible directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-147
Number of pages12
JournalEcological Economics
Volume86
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

genetic resource
reciprocity
academic research
agricultural research
scientific research
effect
protocol
Genetic resources
material
Pathway

Keywords

  • Genetic resources
  • Global policy
  • Material exchange
  • Nagoya Protocol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Potential effects of the Nagoya Protocol on the exchange of non-plant genetic resources for scientific research : Actors, paths, and consequences. / Welch, Eric; Shin, Eunjung; Long, Jennifer.

In: Ecological Economics, Vol. 86, 02.2013, p. 136-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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