Posttraumatic Stress and Stigma in Active-Duty Service Members Relate to Lower Likelihood of Seeking Support

Rebecca K. Blais, Keith D. Renshaw, Matthew Jakupcak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common mental health concern for returning service members. Social support is a robust predictor of resiliency and recovery from PTSD; however, barriers to seeking support are understudied. PTSD and anticipated enacted stigma from family and friends were explored as correlates of the likelihood of seeking support among 153 Iraq/Afghanistan U.S. service members. Results showed that PTSD (r = -.31, p < .001) and anticipated enacted stigma (r = -.22, p ≤ .01) were negatively associated with likelihood of seeking support. Post hoc analyses showed that only dysphoria (r = -.32, p < .001) was significantly related to the likelihood of seeking support after accounting for anticipated enacted stigma and other PTSD clusters. Implications of these findings and ways to increase likelihood of seeking support are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-119
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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