Postdrinking sexual inferences: Evidence for linear rather than curvilinear dosage effects

William H. George, Gail L. Lehman, Kelly Davis, Lorraine J. Martinez, Peter A. Lopez, Jeanette Norris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Observers infer more sexual availability and willingness from a drinking dater. We hypothesized that, as dosage rises, these sexual inferences follow a linear pattern. College participants rated a woman (Study 1) and man (Study 2) exhibiting a sober, moderate, or high level of intoxication while with a light-drinking companion. Alcohol was perceived as having linear effects on sexual availability; and, except for male participants in Study 2, alcohol was perceived as having linear effects on willingness. Thus, with rising intoxication and diminished capacity for arousal, drinkers are perceived as more available and willing. Findings are discussed relative to expectancy models of sexuality. Reasons for desynchrony between alcohol's actual supression of sexual arousal and its perceived enhancement of willingness are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)629-648
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Alcohols
Arousal
Drinking
Sexuality
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Postdrinking sexual inferences : Evidence for linear rather than curvilinear dosage effects. / George, William H.; Lehman, Gail L.; Davis, Kelly; Martinez, Lorraine J.; Lopez, Peter A.; Norris, Jeanette.

In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 27, No. 7, 01.04.1997, p. 629-648.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

George, William H. ; Lehman, Gail L. ; Davis, Kelly ; Martinez, Lorraine J. ; Lopez, Peter A. ; Norris, Jeanette. / Postdrinking sexual inferences : Evidence for linear rather than curvilinear dosage effects. In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 1997 ; Vol. 27, No. 7. pp. 629-648.
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