Possibility of noninvasive biocurrent measurement by ultrasonic tissue resistivity modulation

Bruce C. Towe, Howard Simms

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

It can be shown that ultrasonic waves cause subtle but detectable electrical changes in tissue during their passage. In particular, tissue resistivity changes on the order of 0.01% per atmosphere of sound pressure have been measured. The present experiments show that ionically carried electric currents in tissue when exposed to moderate sound power levels yield an amplitude-modulated signal equal in frequency to the sonic irradiation and proportional in amplitude to the electric current. This process can, in principle, allow determination of the magnitude of a biocurrent in the sound path by detection of the amplitude-modulated component via surface electrodes. This observation has potential application to the noninvasive detection of naturally occurring bioelectric currents in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ, United States
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages1096
Number of pages1
Editionpt 3
ISBN (Print)0879425598
StatePublished - 1990
EventProceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - Philadelphia, PA, USA
Duration: Nov 1 1990Nov 4 1990

Other

OtherProceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
CityPhiladelphia, PA, USA
Period11/1/9011/4/90

Fingerprint

Ultrasonics
Modulation
Acoustic waves
Electric currents
Tissue
Ultrasonic waves
Irradiation
Electrodes
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Towe, B. C., & Simms, H. (1990). Possibility of noninvasive biocurrent measurement by ultrasonic tissue resistivity modulation. In Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology (pt 3 ed., pp. 1096). Piscataway, NJ, United States: Publ by IEEE.

Possibility of noninvasive biocurrent measurement by ultrasonic tissue resistivity modulation. / Towe, Bruce C.; Simms, Howard.

Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology. pt 3. ed. Piscataway, NJ, United States : Publ by IEEE, 1990. p. 1096.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Towe, BC & Simms, H 1990, Possibility of noninvasive biocurrent measurement by ultrasonic tissue resistivity modulation. in Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology. pt 3 edn, Publ by IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, United States, pp. 1096, Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 11/1/90.
Towe BC, Simms H. Possibility of noninvasive biocurrent measurement by ultrasonic tissue resistivity modulation. In Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology. pt 3 ed. Piscataway, NJ, United States: Publ by IEEE. 1990. p. 1096
Towe, Bruce C. ; Simms, Howard. / Possibility of noninvasive biocurrent measurement by ultrasonic tissue resistivity modulation. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology. pt 3. ed. Piscataway, NJ, United States : Publ by IEEE, 1990. pp. 1096
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