64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goals of the present study were to examine (1) the mean-level stability and differential stability of children's positive emotional intensity, negative emotional intensity, expressivity, and social competence from early elementary school-aged to early adolescence, and (2) the associations between the trajectories of children's emotionality and social functioning. Using four waves of longitudinal data (with assessments 2 years apart), parents and teachers of children (199 kindergarten through third grade children at the first assessment) rated children's emotion-related responding and social competence. For all constructs, there was evidence of mean-level decline with age and stability in individual differences in rank ordering. Based on age-centered growth-to-growth curve analyses, the results indicated that children who had a higher initial status on positive emotional intensity, negative emotional intensity, and expressivity had a steeper decline in their social skills across time. These findings provide insight into the stability and association of emotion-related constructs to social competence across the elementary and middle school years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-28
Number of pages14
JournalEmotion
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

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Emotions
Growth
Individuality
Social Skills
Parents

Keywords

  • negative affect
  • positive affect
  • social competence
  • trajectories

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Positive and Negative Emotionality : Trajectories Across Six Years and Relations With Social Competence. / Sallquist, Julie Vaughan; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy; Reiser, Mark; Hofer, Claire; Zhou, Qing; Liew, Jeffrey; Wilkens, Natalie.

In: Emotion, Vol. 9, No. 1, 02.2009, p. 15-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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