Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-poly(ethylene glycol))-acrylate simultaneously physically and chemically gelling polymer systems

Vicki Cheng, Bae Hoon Lee, Christine Pauken, Brent Vernon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an effort to create an in situ physically and chemically cross-linked hydrogel for in vivo applications, N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) was copolymerized with poly(ethylene glycol)-monoacrylate (PEG-monoacrylate) and then the hydroxyl terminus of the PEG was further modified with acryloyl chloride to form poly(NIPAAm-co-PEG) with acrylate terminated pendant groups. In addition to physically gelling with temperature changes, when mixed with a multi-thiol compound such as pentaerythritol tetrakis 3-mercaptopropionate (QT) in phosphate buffer saline solution of pH 7.4, this polymer formed a chemical gel via a Michael-type addition reaction. The chemical gelation time of the polymer was affected by mixing time; swelling of the copolymer solutions was temperature dependant. Because of its unique gelation properties, this material may be better suited for long-term functional replacement applications than other thermo-sensitive physical gels. Also, the PEG content of this material may render it more biocompatible than similar HEMA-based precursors in previous simultaneous chemically and physically gelling materials. With its improved mechanical strength and biocompatibility, this material could potentially be applied as a thermally gelling injectable biomaterial for aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation (AVM) occlusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1201-1207
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Polymer Science
Volume106
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2007

Fingerprint

Polyethylene glycols
Polymers
Gelation
Gels
Addition reactions
Hydrogel
Biocompatible Materials
Biocompatibility
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Biomaterials
Hydrogels
Sodium Chloride
Hydroxyl Radical
Strength of materials
Swelling
Materials properties
Buffers
Phosphates
Copolymers
Temperature

Keywords

  • Cross-linking
  • Hydrogels
  • Injectable biomaterials
  • Michael-type addition
  • Stimuli-sensitive polymers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics

Cite this

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-poly(ethylene glycol))-acrylate simultaneously physically and chemically gelling polymer systems. / Cheng, Vicki; Lee, Bae Hoon; Pauken, Christine; Vernon, Brent.

In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, Vol. 106, No. 2, 15.10.2007, p. 1201-1207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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